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Excess Reserves and Monetary Policy Implementation

Author

Listed:
  • Roc Armenter

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia)

  • Benjamin Lester

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia)

Abstract

In response to the Great Recession, the Federal Reserve resorted to several unconventional policies that drastically altered the landscape of the federal funds market. The current environment, in which depository institutions are flush with excess reserves, has forced policymakers to design a new operational framework for monetary policy implementation. We provide a parsimonious model that captures the key features of the current federal funds market, along with the instruments introduced by the Federal Reserve to implement its target for the federal funds rate. We use this model to analyze the factors that determine rates and volumes under the new implementation framework, and to study the effects of changes in the policy rates and other shocks to the economic environment. We also calibrate the model and use it as a quantitative benchmark for applied analysis, with a particular emphasis on understanding the role of the overnight reverse repurchase agreement facility in supporting the federal funds rate. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Roc Armenter & Benjamin Lester, 2017. "Excess Reserves and Monetary Policy Implementation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 23, pages 212-235, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:15-294
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2016.11.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gara Afonso & Roc Armenter & Benjamin Lester, 2019. "A Model of the Federal Funds Market: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 33, pages 177-204, July.
    2. Thaler, Dominik, 2018. "A Large Central Bank Balance Sheet? The Role of Interbank Market Frictions," VfS Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181632, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Gara M. Afonso & Kyungmin Kim & Antoine Martin & Ed Nosal & Simon M. Potter & Sam Schulhofer-Wohl, 2020. "Monetary Policy Implementation with an Ample Supply of Reserves," Staff Reports 910, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    4. Marcelo Rezende & Mary-Frances Styczynski & Cindy M. Vojtech, 2016. "The Effects of Liquidity Regulation on Bank Demand in Monetary Policy Operations," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-090, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    5. Stephen D. Williamson, 2015. "Interest on Reserves, Interbank Lending, and Monetary Policy," Working Papers 2015-24, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 13 Sep 2015.
    6. Garth Baughman & Francesca Carapella, 2020. "Voluntary Reserve Targets," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 52(2-3), pages 583-612, March.
    7. Bech, Morten & Keister, Todd, 2017. "Liquidity regulation and the implementation of monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 64-77.
    8. Arce, Óscar & Nuño, Galo & Thaler, Dominik & Thomas, Carlos, 2020. "A large central bank balance sheet? Floor vs corridor systems in a New Keynesian environment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 350-367.
    9. Jonathan Chiu & Jens Eisenschmidt & Cyril Monnet, 2020. "Relationships in the Interbank Market," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 35, pages 170-191, January.
    10. Christian Pfister & Jean-Guillaume Sahuc, 2020. "Unconventional monetary policies: A stock-taking exercise," Revue d'économie politique, Dalloz, vol. 130(2), pages 137-169.
    11. W. Arrata & B. Nguyen & I. Rahmouni-Rousseau & M. Vari, 2017. "Eurosystem’s asset purchases and money market rates," Working papers 652, Banque de France.
    12. Keister, Todd, 2019. "The interplay between liquidity regulation, monetary policy implementation and financial stability," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 30-38.
    13. Gara Afonso & Marco Cipriani & Adam Copeland & Anna Kovner & Gabriele La Spada & Antoine Martin, 2020. "The Market Events of Mid-September 2019," Staff Reports 918, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    14. Berentsen, Aleksander & Kraenzlin, Sébastien & Müller, Benjamin, 2018. "Exit strategies for monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 20-40.
    15. Kyungmin Kim & Antoine Martin & Ed Nosal, 2018. "Can the US Interbank Market be Revived?," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2018-088, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), revised 21 Dec 2018.
    16. James A. Clouse & Sam Schulhofer-Wohl, 2018. "A Sequential Bargaining Model of the Fed Funds Market with Excess Reserves," Working Paper Series WP-2018-8, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, revised 01 May 2018.
    17. Jonathan Chiu & Jens Eisenschmidt & Cyril Monnet, 2020. "Relationships in the Interbank Market," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 35, pages 170-191, January.
    18. Gries, Thomas & Mitschke, Alexandra, 2019. "Systemic instability of the interbank credit market: A contribution to a resilient financial system," VfS Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203582, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    19. Roc Armenter, 2016. "A Tractable Model Of The Demand For Reserves Under Nonlinear Remuneration Schemes," Working Papers 16-35, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    20. Ennis, Huberto M., 2018. "A simple general equilibrium model of large excess reserves," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 50-65.
    21. Arrata, William & Nguyen, Benoît & Rahmouni-Rousseau, Imène & Vari, Miklos, 2020. "The scarcity effect of QE on repo rates: Evidence from the euro area," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 137(3), pages 837-856.
    22. William Arrata & Benoit Nguyen & Imene Rahmouni-Rousseau & Miklos Vari, 2018. "The Scarcity Effect of Quantitative Easing on Repo Rates: Evidence from the Euro Area," IMF Working Papers 18/258, International Monetary Fund.
    23. Kyungmin Kim & Antoine Martin & Ed Nosal, 2020. "Can the U.S. Interbank Market Be Revived?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 52(7), pages 1645-1689, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Excess reserves; Federal funds market; Federal funds rate;

    JEL classification:

    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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