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A Model of the Federal Funds Market: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

Author

Listed:
  • Gara Afonso

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Roc Armenter

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia)

  • Benjamin Lester

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia)

Abstract

The landscape of the federal funds market changed drastically in the wake of the Great Recession as large-scale asset purchase programs left depository institutions awash with reserves, and new regulations made it more costly for these institutions to lend. As traditional levers for implementing monetary policy became less effective, the Federal Reserve introduced new tools to implement the target range for the federal funds rate, changing this landscape even more. In this paper, we develop a model that is capable of reproducing the main features of the federal funds market, as observed before and after 2008, in a single, unified framework. We use this model to quantitatively evaluate the evolution of interest rates and trading volume in the federal funds market as the supply of aggregate reserves shrinks. We find that these outcomes are highly sensitive to the dynamics of the distribution of reserves across banks. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Gara Afonso & Roc Armenter & Benjamin Lester, 2019. "A Model of the Federal Funds Market: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 33, pages 177-204, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:18-293
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2019.04.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Adam Copeland, 2019. "The Federal Funds Market over the 2007-09 Crisis," Staff Reports 901, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    2. Lucas Marc Fuhrer & Matthias Jüttner & Jan Wrampelmeyer & Matthias Zwicker, 2021. "Reserve tiering and the interbank market," Working Papers 2021-17, Swiss National Bank.
    3. Gara Afonso & Domenico Giannone & Gabriele La Spada & John C. Williams, 2022. "Scarce, Abundant, or Ample? A Time-Varying Model of the Reserve Demand Curve," Staff Reports 1019, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    4. Gara Afonso & Marco Cipriani & Adam Copeland & Anna Kovner & Gabriele La Spada & Antoine Martin, 2021. "The Market Events of Mid-September 2019," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 27(2), pages 1-26, August.
    5. Toshifumi Nakamura, 2021. "A Simple Model of Interbank Trading with Tiered Remuneration," Applied Economics and Finance, Redfame publishing, vol. 8(1), pages 74-77, January.
    6. Benjamin Lester & Pierre-Olivier Weill & Ariel Zetlin-Jones, 2019. "RED Special Issue on Fragmented Financial Markets: An Introduction," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 33, pages 1-3, July.
    7. James A. Clouse & Sam Schulhofer-Wohl, 2018. "A Sequential Bargaining Model of the Fed Funds Market with Excess Reserves," Working Paper Series WP-2018-8, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    8. Pierre-Olivier Weill, 2020. "The search theory of OTC markets," NBER Working Papers 27354, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Toshifumi Nakamura, 2020. "A simple model of interbank trading with tiered remuneration," Papers 2006.10946, arXiv.org.
    10. Heon Lee, 2021. "Money Creation and Banking: Theory and Evidence," Papers 2109.15096, arXiv.org.
    11. Kolozsi, Pál Péter & Horváth, Gábor, 2020. "Mennyit ér a likviditás?. A magyar bankrendszer likviditáskeresleti függvényének becslése [How much are reserves worth? Estimating interbank liquidity demand in Hungary]," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(2), pages 113-139.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary policy implementation; Federal funds market; Over-the-counter markets;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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