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Implementing Monetary Policy in a Fragmented Monetary Union

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  • Vari, Miklos

Abstract

This paper shows how interbank market fragmentation disrupts monetary policy implementation. Fragmentation is defined as the situation where some banks are cut from the interbank loan market. The paper introduces fragmentation into an otherwise standard theoretical model of monetary policy implementation, where profit maximizing banks, subject to reserve requirements, borrow and deposit funds at the central bank. In the presence of fragmentation, excess liquidity arises endogenously and the interbank rate declines below the central bank main rate. The interbank rate is then unstable. Using data on cross-border financial flows and monetary policy operations, this paper shows that this mechanism has been at work in the euro area since 2008. The model is suitable to analyze conventional and unconventional monetary policy measures in the euro area as well as in other currency areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Vari, Miklos, 2015. "Implementing Monetary Policy in a Fragmented Monetary Union," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 1516, CEPREMAP.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpm:docweb:1516
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Susanna Saroyan & Lilit Popoyan, 2017. "Bank-sovereign ties against interbank market integration: the case of the Italian segment," LEM Papers Series 2017/02, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    2. Grossmann-Wirth, V. & Vari, M., 2016. "Sortie de taux bas en situation d’excédent de liquidité : l’expérience de la Réserve fédérale américaine," Bulletin de la Banque de France, Banque de France, issue 206, pages 41-50.
    3. W. Arrata & B. Nguyen & I. Rahmouni-Rousseau & M. Vari, 2017. "Eurosystem’s asset purchases and money market rates," Working papers 652, Banque de France.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fragmentation; Excess liquidity; interbank market; TARGET2 imbalances;

    JEL classification:

    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements

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