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The interplay between liquidity regulation, monetary policy implementation and financial stability

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  • Keister, Todd

Abstract

I outline a simple framework for thinking through how the Basel III liquidity regulations – in particular, the Liquidity Coverage Ratio (LCR) – will impact short-term interest rates and the process of monetary policy implementation. This framework suggests that a regulatory premium may arise in some market interest rates, creating a new wedge in the monetary transmission mechanism. I discuss ways in which a central bank could react to this new wedge, highlighting what may be a fundamental tension between implementing monetary policy effectively and using liquidity regulation to promote financial stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Keister, Todd, 2019. "The interplay between liquidity regulation, monetary policy implementation and financial stability," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 30-38.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:glofin:v:39:y:2019:i:c:p:30-38
    DOI: 10.1016/j.gfj.2018.01.013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gara Afonso & Ricardo Lagos, 2015. "Trade Dynamics in the Market for Federal Funds," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 83, pages 263-313, January.
    2. Roc Armenter & Benjamin Lester, 2017. "Excess Reserves and Monetary Policy Implementation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 23, pages 212-235, January.
    3. Keister, Todd, 2019. "The interplay between liquidity regulation, monetary policy implementation and financial stability," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 30-38.
    4. Armantier, Olivier & Ghysels, Eric & Sarkar, Asani & Shrader, Jeffrey, 2015. "Discount window stigma during the 2007–2008 financial crisis," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(2), pages 317-335.
    5. Huberto M. Ennis & Todd Keister, 2008. "Understanding monetary policy implementation," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, vol. 94(Sum), pages 235-263.
    6. William Poole, 1968. "Commercial Bank Reserve Management In A Stochastic Model: Implications For Monetary Policy," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 23(5), pages 769-791, December.
    7. Alfred Broaddus & Marvin Goodfriend, 2001. "What assets should the Federal Reserve buy?," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Win, pages 7-22.
    8. Antoine Martin & James McAndrews & David Skeie, 2016. "Bank Lending in Times of Large Bank Reserves," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 12(4), pages 193-222, December.
    9. Bech, Morten L. & Klee, Elizabeth, 2011. "The mechanics of a graceful exit: Interest on reserves and segmentation in the federal funds market," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(5), pages 415-431.
    10. Bech, Morten & Keister, Todd, 2017. "Liquidity regulation and the implementation of monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 64-77.
    11. Bech, Morten & Monnet, Cyril, 2016. "A search-based model of the interbank money market and monetary policy implementation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 32-67.
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    Cited by:

    1. Christian Pfister & Jean-Guillaume Sahuc, 2020. "Unconventional monetary policies: A stock-taking exercise," Revue d'économie politique, Dalloz, vol. 130(2), pages 137-169.
    2. Keister, Todd, 2019. "The interplay between liquidity regulation, monetary policy implementation and financial stability," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 30-38.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Basel III; Liquidity coverage ratio (LCR); Interbank markets; Monetary policy transmission;

    JEL classification:

    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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