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A time-varying parameter structural model of the UK economy

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  • Kapetanios, George
  • Masolo, Riccardo M.
  • Petrova, Katerina
  • Waldron, Matthew

Abstract

We estimate a time-varying parameter structural macroeconomic model of the UK economy, using a Bayesian local likelihood methodology. This enables us to estimate a large open-economy DSGE model over a sample that comprises several different monetary policy regimes and an incomplete set of data. Our estimation identifies a gradual shift to a monetary policy regime characterised by an increased responsiveness of policy towards inflation alongside a decrease in the inflation trend down to the two percent target level. The time-varying model also performs remarkably well in forecasting and delivers statistically significant accuracy improvements for most variables and horizons for both point and density forecasts compared to the standard fixed-parameter version.

Suggested Citation

  • Kapetanios, George & Masolo, Riccardo M. & Petrova, Katerina & Waldron, Matthew, 2019. "A time-varying parameter structural model of the UK economy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 1-1.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:106:y:2019:i:c:5
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jedc.2019.05.012
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:intfor:v:35:y:2019:i:1:p:100-120 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Aquilante, Tommaso & Chowla, Shiv & Dacic, Nikola & Haldane, Andrew & Masolo, Riccardo & Schneider, Patrick & Seneca, Martin & Tatomir, Srdan, 2019. "Market power and monetary policy," Bank of England working papers 798, Bank of England.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    DSGE models; Open economy; Time varying parameters; UK economy;

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • E27 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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