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Financial Business Cycles

  • Matteo Iacoviello

    (Federal Reserve Board)

recapitalizing or by deleveraging. By deleveraging, banks transform the initial redistribution shock into a classic credit crunch, and amplify and propagate the fi nancial shock to the real economy. In my benchmark experiment, credit losses (that is, a redistribution shock) of about 4% of GDP leads to a 1 percent impact decline on output, whereas they would have no effect on GDP in a model where banks are a veil. Nominal rigidities generate even larger recessions given the same shock.

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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2010 Meeting Papers with number 1053.

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Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:1053
Contact details of provider: Postal: Society for Economic Dynamics Marina Azzimonti Department of Economics Stonybrook University 10 Nicolls Road Stonybrook NY 11790 USA
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  1. Yuliy Sannikov & Markus K. Brunnermeier, 2010. "A Macroeconomic Model with a Financial Sector," 2010 Meeting Papers 1114, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Urban Jermann & Vincenzo Quadrini, 2012. "Erratum: Macroeconomic Effects of Financial Shocks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(2), pages 1186-1186, April.
  3. Marvin Goodfriend & Bennett T. McCallum, 2007. "Banking and interest rates in monetary policy analysis: a quantitative exploration," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  4. Robert Kollmann & Zeno Enders & Gernot J. Müller, 2010. "Global Banking and International Business Cycles," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2010-028, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  5. Vasco Cúrdia & Michael Woodford, 2009. "Conventional and unconventional monetary policy," Staff Reports 404, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  6. Andreasen, Martin M. & Ferman, Marcelo & Zabczyk, Pawel, 2012. "The business cycle implications of banks' maturity transformation," Working Paper Series 1489, European Central Bank.
  7. Andrea Gerali & Stefano Neri & Luca Sessa & Federico M. Signoretti, 2010. "Credit and banking in a DSGE model of the euro area," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 740, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  8. Urban Jermann & Vincenzo Quadrini, 2009. "Macroeconomic Effects of Financial Shocks," NBER Working Papers 15338, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. An, Sungbae & Schorfheide, Frank, 2005. "Bayesian Analysis of DSGE Models," CEPR Discussion Papers 5207, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  10. Stephen D. Williamson, 2012. "Liquidity, Monetary Policy, and the Financial Crisis: A New Monetarist Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(6), pages 2570-2605, October.
  11. Gertler, Mark & Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro, 2010. "Financial Intermediation and Credit Policy in Business Cycle Analysis," Handbook of Monetary Economics, in: Benjamin M. Friedman & Michael Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 11, pages 547-599 Elsevier.
  12. Gertler, Mark & Karadi, Peter, 2011. "A model of unconventional monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 17-34, January.
  13. Skander Van den Heuvel, 2005. "The Welfare Cost of Bank Capital Requirements," 2005 Meeting Papers 880, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  14. Matteo Iacoviello, 2002. "House prices, borrowing constraints and monetary policy in the business cycle," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 542, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 06 Dec 2004.
  15. Sungbae An & Frank Schorfheide, 2007. "Bayesian Analysis of DSGE Models—Rejoinder," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2-4), pages 211-219.
  16. Chiara Forlati & Luisa Lambertini, 2011. "Risky Mortgages in a DSGE Model," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 7(1), pages 285-335, March.
  17. Lawrence J. Christiano & Roberto Motto & Massimo Rostagno, 2014. "Risk Shocks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(1), pages 27-65, January.
  18. Roger Aliaga‐Díaz & María Pía Olivero, 2010. "Macroeconomic Implications of “Deep Habits” in Banking," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(8), pages 1495-1521, December.
  19. Pablo A. Neumeyer & Fabrizio Perri, 2004. "Business Cycles in Emerging Economies: The Role of Interest Rates," NBER Working Papers 10387, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  20. Angeloni, Ignazio & Faia, Ester, 2013. "Capital regulation and monetary policy with fragile banks," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 311-324.
  21. Césaire Meh & Kevin Moran, 2008. "The Role of Bank Capital in the Propagation of Shocks," Staff Working Papers 08-36, Bank of Canada.
  22. Michael T. Kiley & Jae W. Sim, 2011. "Financial capital and the macroeconomy: a quantitative framework," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2011-27, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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