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Melinda Pitts

Personal Details

First Name:Melinda
Middle Name:
Last Name:Pitts
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppi175

Affiliation

(in no particular order)

Economic Research Department
Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Atlanta, Georgia (United States)
http://www.frbatlanta.org/research/



1000 Peachtree St., N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 30309
RePEc:edi:efrbaus (more details at EDIRC)

Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Atlanta, Georgia (United States)
http://www.frbatlanta.org/

404-521-8500

1000 Peachtree St., N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 30309
RePEc:edi:frbatus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. David E. Frisvold & Melinda Pitts, 2018. "State Merit Aid Programs and Youth Labor Market Attachment," NBER Working Papers 24662, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Argys, Laura & Friedson, Andrew & Pitts, M. Melinda & Tello-Trillo, D. Sebastian, 2017. "Losing Public Health Insurance: TennCare Disenrollment and Personal Financial Distress," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2017-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, revised 01 Sep 2017.
  3. Argys, Laura & Friedson, Andrew & Pitts, M. Melinda, 2016. "Killer Debt: The Impact of Debt on Mortality," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2016-14, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  4. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Walker, Mary Beth, 2014. "Impact of first-birth career interruption on earnings: evidence from administrative data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2014-23, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  5. Sabia, Joseph J. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Argys, Laura, 2014. "Do Minimum Wages Really Increase Youth Drinking and Drunk Driving?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2014-20, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  6. Maasoumi, Esfandiar & Pitts, M. Melinda & Wu, Ke, 2014. "The gap between the conditional wage distributions of incumbents and the newly hired employees: decomposition and uniform ordering," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2014-22, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  7. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Pitts, M. Melinda, 2013. "Even one is too much: the economic consequences of being a smoker," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2013-03, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  8. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & Mary Beth Walker, 2008. "Working with children? the probability of mothers exiting the workforce at time of birth," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2008-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  9. Brian S. Armour & M. Melinda Pitts & Chung-won Lee, 2007. "Cigarette smoking and food insecurity among low-income families in the United States, 2001," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  10. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "Evidence of demand factors in the determination of the labor market intermittency penalty," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  11. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "The role of labor market intermittency in explaining gender wage differentials," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-01, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  12. Brian S. Armour & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "Does disability explain state-level differences in the quality of Medicare beneficiary hospital inpatient care?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-18, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  13. Brian S. Armour & M. Melinda Pitts, 2006. "Smoking: taxing health and Social Security," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2006-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  14. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2006. "The push-pull effects of the information technology boom and bust: insight from matched employer-employee data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2006-01, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  15. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2005. "Earnings on the information technology roller coaster: insight from matched employer-employee data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2005-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  16. Julie L. Hotchkiss & Robert E. Moore & M. Melinda Pitts, 2005. "Freshman learning communities, college performance, and retention," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2005-22, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  17. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2004. "Wage gains among job changers across the business cycle:> insight from state administrative data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2004-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  18. Brian S. Armour & Carol Friedman & M. Melinda Pitts & Jennifer Wike & Linda Alley & Jeff Etchason, 2003. "The influence of year-end bonuses on colorectal cancer screening," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-41, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  19. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2003. "The ups and downs of jobs in Georgia: what can we learn about employment dynamics from state administrative data?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-38, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  20. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2003. "Female labor force intermittency and current earnings: a switching regression model with unknown sample selection," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-33, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  21. Brian S. Armour & M. Melinda Pitts, 2002. "Incorporating insurance rate estimates and differential mortality into net marginal Social Security tax rate calculations," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2002-29, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  22. M. Melinda Pitts, 2002. "Why choose women's work if it pays less? A structural model of occupational choice," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2002-30, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

Articles

  1. Brian S. Armour & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "Smoking: taxing health and Social Security," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q 3, pages 27-41.
  2. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "The Role of Labor Market Intermittency in Explaining Gender Wage Differentials," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 417-421, May.
  3. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2006. "Earnings on the Information Technology Roller Coaster: Insight from Matched Employer-Employee Data," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(2), pages 342-361, October.
  4. Julie Hotchkiss & Robert Moore & M. Melinda Pitts, 2006. "Freshman Learning Communities, College Performance, and Retention," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 197-210.
  5. M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson & Ellis W. Tallman, 2005. "Ill winds can’t blow U.S. economy off course," EconSouth, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q4.
  6. Jason DeBacker & Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2005. "It's who you are and what you do: explaining the IT industry wage premium," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q 3, pages 37-45.
  7. Brian S. Armour & M. Melinda Pitts, 2005. "The quality of preventive and diagnostic medical care: why do southern states underperform?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q 1, pages 59-67.
  8. Julie Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2005. "Female labour force intermittency and current earnings: switching regression model with unknown sample selection," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(5), pages 545-560.
  9. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2003. "At What Level of Labor-Market Intermittency Are Women Penalized?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 233-237, May.
  10. John C. Robertson & David Avery & Michael J. Chriszt & Whitney Mancuso & M. Melinda Pitts & Navnita Sarma & Gustavo A. Uceda, 2002. "Southeastern economy still feeling recession's effects," EconSouth, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q4, pages 8-23.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Pitts, M. Melinda, 2013. "Even one is too much: the economic consequences of being a smoker," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2013-03, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Mentioned in:

    1. How smoking hurts you on the labor market
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2013-09-06 19:33:00
    2. #HEJC papers for August 2013
      by academichealtheconomists in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2013-08-01 04:00:48

Wikipedia mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Sabia, Joseph J. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Argys, Laura, 2014. "Do Minimum Wages Really Increase Youth Drinking and Drunk Driving?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2014-20, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Are Minimum Wages a Silent Killer? New Evidence on Drunk Driving Fatalities (REStat forthcoming) in ReplicationWiki ()
  2. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "The Role of Labor Market Intermittency in Explaining Gender Wage Differentials," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 417-421, May.

    Mentioned in:

    1. The Role of Labor Market Intermittency in Explaining Gender Wage Differentials (AER 2007) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Argys, Laura & Friedson, Andrew & Pitts, M. Melinda & Tello-Trillo, D. Sebastian, 2017. "Losing Public Health Insurance: TennCare Disenrollment and Personal Financial Distress," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2017-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, revised 01 Sep 2017.

    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Miller & Luojia Hu & Robert Kaestner & Bhashkar Mazumder & Ashley Wong, 2018. "The ACA Medicaid Expansion in Michigan and Financial Health," NBER Working Papers 25053, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Argys, Laura & Friedson, Andrew & Pitts, M. Melinda, 2016. "Killer Debt: The Impact of Debt on Mortality," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2016-14, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Wang, Chenggang & Wang, Huixia & Halliday, Timothy J., 2017. "Health and Health Inequality during the Great Recession: Evidence from the PSID," IZA Discussion Papers 10808, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Chenggang Wang & Huixia Wang & Timothy J. Halliday, 2017. "Health and Health Inequality during the Great Recession: Evidence from the PSID," Working Papers 201703, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    3. Argys, Laura & Friedson, Andrew & Pitts, M. Melinda & Tello-Trillo, D. Sebastian, 2017. "Losing Public Health Insurance: TennCare Disenrollment and Personal Financial Distress," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2017-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, revised 01 Sep 2017.

  3. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Walker, Mary Beth, 2014. "Impact of first-birth career interruption on earnings: evidence from administrative data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2014-23, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. YoonKyung Chung & Barbara Downs & Danielle H. Sandler & Robert Sienkiewicz, 2017. "The Parental Gender Earnings Gap in the United States," Working Papers 17-68, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    2. Shulamit Kahn & Donna Ginther, 2017. "Women and STEM," NBER Working Papers 23525, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  4. Sabia, Joseph J. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Argys, Laura, 2014. "Do Minimum Wages Really Increase Youth Drinking and Drunk Driving?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2014-20, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael R. Strain & Peter Brummund, 2016. "Real and permanent minimum wages," AEI Economics Working Papers 875967, American Enterprise Institute.
    2. Brady P. Horn & Johanna Catherine Maclean & Michael R. Strain, 2017. "Do Minimum Wage Increases Influence Worker Health?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(4), pages 1986-2007, October.
    3. Kabir Dasgupta & Gail Pacheco, 2016. "Warrantless arrest laws for domestic violence: How are youth affected?," Working Papers 2016-07, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
    4. Averett, Susan L. & Smith, Julie K. & Wang, Yang, 2016. "The Effects of Minimum Wages on the Health of Working Teenagers," IZA Discussion Papers 10185, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Kabir Dasgupta, 2016. "Youth Response to State Cyberbullying Laws," Working Papers 2016-05, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
    6. Sabia, Joseph J. & Bass, Brittany, 2015. "Do Anti-Bullying Laws Reduce Youth Violence?," IZA Discussion Papers 9201, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  5. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & Mary Beth Walker, 2008. "Working with children? the probability of mothers exiting the workforce at time of birth," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2008-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Miguel A. Vicens-Feliberty & Francisca Reyes, 2015. "Female Labor Force Participation and Dependency Ratios in Border States," Journal of Borderlands Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(2), pages 137-150, May.

  6. Brian S. Armour & M. Melinda Pitts & Chung-won Lee, 2007. "Cigarette smoking and food insecurity among low-income families in the United States, 2001," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Yunhee Chang & Swarn Chatterjee & Jinhee Kim, 2014. "Household Finance and Food Insecurity," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(4), pages 499-515, December.
    2. Duffy, Patricia A. & Zizza, Claire A. & Zhu, Min & Kinnucan, Henry W. & Tayie, Francis A., 2008. "Food Insecurity, Diet Quality, and Body Weight: Inter-Relationships and the Effect of Smoking and Alcohol Consumption," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6155, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

  7. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "Evidence of demand factors in the determination of the labor market intermittency penalty," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Julie Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2010. "The demand side of the penalty for intermittent labour market behaviour," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(6), pages 531-535.

  8. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "The role of labor market intermittency in explaining gender wage differentials," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-01, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Walker, Mary Beth, 2014. "Impact of first-birth career interruption on earnings: evidence from administrative data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2014-23, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    2. Robst, John, 2008. "Childhood sexual abuse and the gender wage gap," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(3), pages 549-551, June.
    3. Enrico Ciavolino & Claudia Sunna & Paola Pascali & Mariangela Nitti, 2016. "Women resignation during maternal leave," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(4), pages 1747-1763, July.
    4. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "Evidence of demand factors in the determination of the labor market intermittency penalty," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    5. Héctor Pifarré i Arolas, 2017. "A cohort perspective of the effect of unemployment on fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(4), pages 1211-1239, October.
    6. Binder, Ariel J. & Lam, David, 2018. "Is There a Male Breadwinner Norm? The Hazards of Inferring Preferences from Marriage Market Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 11693, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Julie Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2010. "The demand side of the penalty for intermittent labour market behaviour," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(6), pages 531-535.
    8. SeEun Jung & Chung Choe & Ronald L. Oaxaca, 2017. "Gender Wage Gaps and Risky vs. Secure Employment: An Experimental Analysis," Inha University IBER Working Paper Series 2017-7, Inha University, Institute of Business and Economic Research, revised Jul 2017.
    9. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & Mary Beth Walker, 2008. "Working with children? the probability of mothers exiting the workforce at time of birth," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2008-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    10. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Walker, Mary Beth, 2011. "To work or not to work: the economics of a mother's dilemma," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2011-02, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    11. Haile, Getinet Astatike, 2016. "Men, Women and Unions," IZA Discussion Papers 10438, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Haile, Getinet Astatike, 2016. "Intergenerational Mobility in Income and Economic Status in Ethiopia," IZA Discussion Papers 10047, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Joseph, Olivier & Pailhé, Ariane & Recotillet, Isabelle & Solaz, Anne, 2013. "The economic impact of taking short parental leave: Evaluation of a French reform," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 63-75.
    14. Ariel J. Binder & David Lam, 2018. "Is There a Male Breadwinner Norm? The Hazards of Inferring Preferences from Marriage Market Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 24907, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  9. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2006. "The push-pull effects of the information technology boom and bust: insight from matched employer-employee data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2006-01, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Julie L. Hotchkiss & Menbere Shiferaw, 2011. "Decomposing the education wage gap: everything but the kitchen sink," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue July, pages 243-272.

  10. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2005. "Earnings on the information technology roller coaster: insight from matched employer-employee data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2005-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Robertson, John C., 2008. "The Push-Pull Effects of the Information Technology Boom and Bust," MPRA Paper 44800, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2006. "The push-pull effects of the information technology boom and bust: insight from matched employer-employee data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2006-01, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

  11. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2004. "Wage gains among job changers across the business cycle:> insight from state administrative data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2004-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Julie Hotchkiss & M. Pitts & Mary Walker, 2011. "Labor force exit decisions of new mothers," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 397-414, September.
    2. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2005. "Earnings on the information technology roller coaster: insight from matched employer-employee data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2005-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    3. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2006. "The push-pull effects of the information technology boom and bust: insight from matched employer-employee data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2006-01, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

  12. Brian S. Armour & Carol Friedman & M. Melinda Pitts & Jennifer Wike & Linda Alley & Jeff Etchason, 2003. "The influence of year-end bonuses on colorectal cancer screening," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-41, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Ellen P. Green, 2013. "Payment Systems in the Healthcare Industry: An Experimental Study Of Physician Incentives," Working Papers 13-05, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    2. Linda Dynan, 2009. "The Contribution of Economists to Understanding Racial Health Disparities in the US," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 37(3), pages 213-223, September.

  13. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2003. "The ups and downs of jobs in Georgia: what can we learn about employment dynamics from state administrative data?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-38, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2005. "Comment," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 23, pages 154-157, April.
    2. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2004. "Wage gains among job changers across the business cycle:> insight from state administrative data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2004-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

  14. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2003. "Female labor force intermittency and current earnings: a switching regression model with unknown sample selection," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-33, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "Evidence of demand factors in the determination of the labor market intermittency penalty," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    2. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "The Role of Labor Market Intermittency in Explaining Gender Wage Differentials," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 417-421, May.
    3. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Walker, Mary Beth, 2011. "To work or not to work: the economics of a mother's dilemma," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2011-02, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

  15. Brian S. Armour & M. Melinda Pitts, 2002. "Incorporating insurance rate estimates and differential mortality into net marginal Social Security tax rate calculations," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2002-29, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Brian S. Armour & M. Melinda Pitts, 2006. "Smoking: taxing health and Social Security," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2006-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    2. Amy Rehder Harris & John Sabelhaus, 2005. "How Does Differential Mortality Affect Social Security Finances and Progressivity? Working Paper 2005-05," Working Papers 16493, Congressional Budget Office.
    3. Julian P. Cristia, 2007. "The Empirical Relationship Between Lifetime Earnings and Mortality: Working Paper 2007-11," Working Papers 19096, Congressional Budget Office.

  16. M. Melinda Pitts, 2002. "Why choose women's work if it pays less? A structural model of occupational choice," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2002-30, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    Cited by:

    1. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "Evidence of demand factors in the determination of the labor market intermittency penalty," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    2. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Rupasingha, Anil, 2016. "Wage Determination in Social Occupations: The Role of Individual Social Capital," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2016-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    3. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "The Role of Labor Market Intermittency in Explaining Gender Wage Differentials," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 417-421, May.
    4. Christine Siegwarth Meyer & Swati Mukerjee, 2007. "Investigating Dual Labor Market Theory For Women," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 33(3), pages 301-316, Summer.
    5. T. Clifton Green & Narasimhan Jegadeesh & Yue Tang, 2007. "Gender and Job Performance: Evidence from Wall Street," NBER Working Papers 12897, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "The Role of Labor Market Intermittency in Explaining Gender Wage Differentials," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 417-421, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2006. "Earnings on the Information Technology Roller Coaster: Insight from Matched Employer-Employee Data," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(2), pages 342-361, October.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Jason DeBacker & Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2005. "It's who you are and what you do: explaining the IT industry wage premium," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q 3, pages 37-45.

    Cited by:

    1. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Robertson, John C., 2008. "The Push-Pull Effects of the Information Technology Boom and Bust," MPRA Paper 44800, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  4. Julie Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2005. "Female labour force intermittency and current earnings: switching regression model with unknown sample selection," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(5), pages 545-560.

    Cited by:

    1. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Walker, Mary Beth, 2014. "Impact of first-birth career interruption on earnings: evidence from administrative data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2014-23, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    2. Das, Tirthatanmoy & Polachek, Solomon, 2017. "Micro Foundations of Earnings Differences," IZA Discussion Papers 10922, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Coulson, N. Edward & Li, Herman, 2013. "Measuring the external benefits of homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 57-67.
    4. Polachek, Solomon W., 2008. "Earnings Over the Life Cycle: The Mincer Earnings Function and Its Applications," Foundations and Trends(R) in Microeconomics, now publishers, vol. 4(3), pages 165-272, April.
    5. Tang, Mingzhe & Coulson, N. Edward, 2017. "The impact of China's housing provident fund on homeownership, housing consumption and housing investment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 25-37.
    6. James Gander, 2009. "Equity valuation under Bull and Bear market regimes in South East Asia firms: a switching regression approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(7), pages 837-844.
    7. Julie L. Hotchkiss, 2005. "What’s up with the decline in female labor force participation?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2005-18, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    8. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & Mary Beth Walker, 2008. "Working with children? the probability of mothers exiting the workforce at time of birth," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2008-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

  5. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2003. "At What Level of Labor-Market Intermittency Are Women Penalized?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 233-237, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Das, Tirthatanmoy & Polachek, Solomon, 2017. "Micro Foundations of Earnings Differences," IZA Discussion Papers 10922, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Julie Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2005. "Female labour force intermittency and current earnings: switching regression model with unknown sample selection," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(5), pages 545-560.
    3. Yana van der Meulen Rodgers & Joseph Zveglich & Laura Wherry, 2006. "Gender Differences In Vocational School Training And Earnings Premiums In Taiwan," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 527-560.
    4. Polachek, Solomon W., 2008. "Earnings Over the Life Cycle: The Mincer Earnings Function and Its Applications," Foundations and Trends(R) in Microeconomics, now publishers, vol. 4(3), pages 165-272, April.
    5. Christine Siegwarth Meyer & Swati Mukerjee, 2007. "Investigating Dual Labor Market Theory For Women," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 33(3), pages 301-316, Summer.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 21 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (8) 2004-02-29 2006-10-14 2007-08-27 2007-09-09 2013-07-15 2015-01-14 2016-12-11 2017-09-10. Author is listed
  2. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (6) 2003-01-27 2004-09-05 2007-02-17 2008-04-12 2015-01-26 2015-01-31. Author is listed
  3. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (3) 2003-01-27 2007-08-27 2017-09-10
  4. NEP-EDU: Education (2) 2005-11-05 2015-01-31
  5. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (2) 2018-07-09 2018-08-13
  6. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (2) 2018-07-09 2018-08-13
  7. NEP-BAN: Banking (1) 2016-12-11
  8. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2005-07-11
  9. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2015-01-26
  10. NEP-KNM: Knowledge Management & Knowledge Economy (1) 2018-07-09
  11. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2015-01-26
  12. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2006-10-14
  13. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (1) 2006-10-14
  14. NEP-REG: Regulation (1) 2006-10-14
  15. NEP-SOG: Sociology of Economics (1) 2005-11-05

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Melinda Pitts should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.