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The push-pull effects of the information technology boom and bust: insight from matched employer-employee data

  • Julie L. Hotchkiss
  • M. Melinda Pitts
  • John C. Robertson

This paper examines the inflow and outflow of workers to different industries in Georgia during the information technology (IT) boom of the 1990s and the subsequent bust. Workers in the software and computer services industry were much more likely to have been absent from the Georgia workforce prior to the boom but were no more likely than workers from other industries to have exited the workforce during the bust. Consequently, the Georgia workforce likely experienced a net gain in worker human capital as a result of being an area of concentration of IT-producing activity during the IT boom.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta in its series FRB Atlanta Working Paper with number 2006-01.

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Date of creation: 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2006-01
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  1. Daniel Chiquiar & Gordon H. Hanson, 2002. "International Migration, Self-Selection, and the Distribution of Wages: Evidence from Mexico and the United States," NBER Working Papers 9242, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2006. "Earnings on the Information Technology Roller Coaster: Insight from Matched Employer-Employee Data," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(2), pages 342–361, October.
  3. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2004. "Wage gains among job changers across the business cycle:> insight from state administrative data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2004-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  4. Klaus F. Zimmermann, 1996. "European Migration: Push and Pull," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 19(1-2), pages 95-128, April.
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  7. Edward L. Glaeser & Albert Saiz, 2003. "The Rise of the Skilled City," NBER Working Papers 10191, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  9. Alfred Nucci & Charles Tolbert & Troy Blanchard & Michael Irwin, 2002. "Leaving Home: Modeling the Effect of Civic and Economic Structure on Individual Migration Patterns," Working Papers 02-16, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  10. Robert L. Boyd, 2002. "A "Migration of Despair": Unemployment, the Search for Work, and Migration to Farms During the Great Depression," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 83(2), pages 554-567.
  11. Sammis B. White & John F. Zipp & William F. McMahon & Peter D. Reynolds & Jeffrey D. Osterman & Lisa S. Binkley, 1990. "ES202: The Data Base for Local Employment Analysis," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 4(3), pages 240-253, August.
  12. Mary C. Daly & Robert G. Valletta, 2004. "Performance of urban information technology centers: the boom, the bust, and the future," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 1-18.
  13. Cynthia Feliciano, 2005. "Educational selectivity in U.S. Immigration: How do immigrants compare to those left behind?," Demography, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 131-152, February.
  14. Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2003. "On The Specification and Estimation of The Production Function for Cognitive Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages F3-F33, February.
  15. Jacob Mincer & Boyan Jovanovic, 1979. "Labor Mobility and Wages," NBER Working Papers 0357, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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