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The Push-Pull Effects of the Information Technology Boom and Bust


  • Julie L. Hotchkiss

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta and Georgia State University)

  • M. Melinda Pitts

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta)

  • John C. Robertson

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta)


This article examines the inflow and outflow of workers to different industries in Georgia during the information technology (IT) boom of the 1990s and the subsequent bust. Workers in the software and computer services industry were much more likely to have been absent from the Georgia workforce before the boom but were no more likely than workers from other industries to have exited Georgia's workforce during the bust. Consequently, Georgia likely experienced a net gain in worker human capital as a result of being an area of concentration of IT-producing activity during the IT boom.

Suggested Citation

  • Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2008. "The Push-Pull Effects of the Information Technology Boom and Bust," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 22(3), pages 200-212, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ecdequ:v:22:y:2008:i:3:p:200-212

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2006. "Earnings on the Information Technology Roller Coaster: Insight from Matched Employer-Employee Data," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(2), pages 342-361, October.
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    More about this item


    push-pull; migration; information technology; administrative data;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes


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