IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/aut/wpaper/201605.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Youth Response to State Cyberbullying Laws

Author

Listed:
  • Kabir Dasgupta

    () (NZ Work Research Institute, Faculty of Business, Economics, and Law, Auckland Univeristy of Technology)

Abstract

Cyberbullying is a large social concern among youth in the US. This is the first empirical study to examine how high-school teenagers respond to cyberbullying laws that require schools to enact effective guidelines to reduce cyberbullying. The analysis utilizes nationally representative samples of high-school students from Youth Risk Behavior Surveys and incorporates state and time variation in the implementation of cyberbullying laws to estimate the causal impacts of the law in a difference-in-differences framework. Key results indicate that adoption of cyberbullying law is related to statistically significant increases in the likelihood that students report experiences of being victimized by various forms of school violence. Further empirical tests reveal (to some degree) that the state laws are potentiallymore likely to promote victims’ reporting of school violence/ cyberbullying victimization experiences. Finally, evaluation of important components of the state laws indicate that compared to other legislative provisions, criminal sanctions are more likely to increase victims’ reporting of school violence victimization. The regression estimates are robust to the inclusion of multiple sensitivity checks.

Suggested Citation

  • Kabir Dasgupta, 2016. "Youth Response to State Cyberbullying Laws," Working Papers 2016-05, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:aut:wpaper:201605
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.aut.ac.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/695259/Economics-WP-2016-05.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Almond, Douglas & Currie, Janet, 2011. "Human Capital Development before Age Five," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    2. D. Mark Anderson & Benjamin Hansen & Daniel I. Rees, 2015. "Medical Marijuana Laws and Teen Marijuana Use," American Law and Economics Review, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(2), pages 495-528.
    3. Sabia, Joseph J. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Argys, Laura, 2014. "Do Minimum Wages Really Increase Youth Drinking and Drunk Driving?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2014-20, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    4. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2009. "Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 8769, December.
    5. Iyengar, Radha, 2009. "Does the certainty of arrest reduce domestic violence? Evidence from mandatory and recommended arrest laws," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1-2), pages 85-98, February.
    6. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2009.186007_1 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2003. "On The Specification and Estimation of The Production Function for Cognitive Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages 3-33, February.
    8. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2011.300308_9 is not listed on IDEAS
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:irlaec:v:50:y:2017:i:c:p:1-6 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cyberbullying Laws; Electronic Harassment; Youth; Youth Reporting; School Violence; Mental Health; Difference-in-differences.;

    JEL classification:

    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • K32 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Energy, Environmental, Health, and Safety Law

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aut:wpaper:201605. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gail Pacheco). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/fbautnz.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.