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The Height Production Function from Birth to Age Two

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  • Elisabetta De Cao

Abstract

Infancy is one of the most critical periods for the formation of adult height. This paper studies the determinants of height from birth to age 2 using rich longitudinal data on Filipino children. A height production function is specified in which height is the result of the accumulation of inputs (i.e., nutrition and diseases) over time. The empirical specification allows the causal identification of the age-specific effects of both nutrition and diseases on height. Considering gender differences in growth patterns, the results show that diseases play a major role in reducing height and that girls are more strongly affected than boys.

Suggested Citation

  • Elisabetta De Cao, 2015. "The Height Production Function from Birth to Age Two," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(3), pages 329-363.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jhucap:doi:10.1086/682356
    DOI: 10.1086/682356
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    Cited by:

    1. Laura Abramovsky & Britta Augsburg & Pamela Jervis & Bansi Malde & Angus Phimister, 2019. "Complementarities in the Production of Child Health," IFS Working Papers W19/15, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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    3. Gabriella Conti & Mark Hanson & Hazel M. Inskip & Sarah Crozier & Cyrus Cooper & Keith Godfrey, 2018. "Beyond birth weight: the origins of human capital," IFS Working Papers W18/30, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General

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