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The demand side of the penalty for intermittent labour market behaviour

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  • Julie Hotchkiss
  • M. Melinda Pitts

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to determine whether there is any empirical evidence for the contribution of employer, or demand-side, determinants of the labour market intermittency penalty. The documented negative relationship between the size of the penalty and the labour market strength is interpreted as evidence that labour market intermittency is viewed as an undesirable characteristic that employers penalize more severely when the labour market is weak.

Suggested Citation

  • Julie Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2010. "The demand side of the penalty for intermittent labour market behaviour," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(6), pages 531-535.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:17:y:2010:i:6:p:531-535
    DOI: 10.1080/13504850802167181
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