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Impact of first birth career interruption on earnings: evidence from administrative data

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  • Julie L. Hotchkiss
  • M. Melinda Pitts
  • Mary Beth Walker

Abstract

This article makes use of unique administrative data to expand the understanding of the role women’s intermittency decisions play in the determination of her wages. We demonstrate that treating intermittency as exogenous significantly overstates its impact. The intermittency penalty also increases in the education level of the woman. The penalty for women with a high school degree with an average amount of intermittency during 6 years after giving birth to her first child is roughly half the penalty for college graduates. We also demonstrate the value of making use of an index to capture multiple dimension of the intermittency experience, and illustrate the importance of firm dynamics in the determination of a woman’s wage.

Suggested Citation

  • Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & Mary Beth Walker, 2017. "Impact of first birth career interruption on earnings: evidence from administrative data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(35), pages 3509-3522, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:49:y:2017:i:35:p:3509-3522
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2016.1262523
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00036846.2016.1262523
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. YoonKyung Chung & Barbara Downs & Danielle H. Sandler & Robert Sienkiewicz, 2017. "The Parental Gender Earnings Gap in the United States," Working Papers 17-68, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    2. Shulamit Kahn & Donna Ginther, 2017. "Women and STEM," NBER Working Papers 23525, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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