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Human capital depreciation during hometime

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  • Dennis Görlich
  • Andries de Grip

Abstract

We estimate human capital depreciation rates during career interruptions due to family reasons (parental leave and household time) in male- and female-dominated occupations. If human capital depreciation due to family related career breaks is lower in female than in male occupations, this can explain occupational sex segregation because women will take the costs of future breaks into account when optimizing their lifetime earnings. We find that short-run depreciation rates in high-skilled occupations are significantly lower in female than in male occupations. In low-skilled occupations, there is no evidence of this difference. Our findings support the self-selection hypothesis with respect to occupational sex segregation in the more skilled jobs, i.e. high-skilled women might deliberately choose female occupations because of the lower short-term wage penalties for family-related career interruptions. Copyright 2009 , Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Dennis Görlich & Andries de Grip, 2009. "Human capital depreciation during hometime," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(suppl_1), pages 98-121, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:61:y:2009:i:suppl_1:p:i98-i121
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gpn044
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    Cited by:

    1. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2013. "The Feasibility and Importance of Adding Measures of Actual Experience to Cross-Sectional Data Collection," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(S1), pages 17-58.
    2. Abraham, Katharine G. & Haltiwanger, John C. & Sandusky, L. Kristin & Spletzer, James R., 2016. "The Consequences of Long Term Unemployment: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data," IZA Discussion Papers 10223, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Potrafke, Niklas, 2012. "Unemployment, human capital depreciation and pension benefits: an empirical evaluation of German data," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(02), pages 223-241, April.
    4. World Bank, 2017. "Republic of Armenia Leveling the STEM Playing Field for Women," World Bank Other Operational Studies 26766, The World Bank.
    5. Hamann, Silke & Niebuhr, Annekatrin & Peters, Jan Cornelius, 2016. "Benefits of dense labour markets: Evidence from transitions to employment in Germany," Economics Working Papers 2016-07, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
    6. Li Ma, 2014. "Economic crisis and women’s labor force return after childbirth: Evidence from South Korea," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(18), pages 511-552, August.
    7. Ben Ost, 2014. "How Do Teachers Improve? The Relative Importance of Specific and General Human Capital," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 127-151, April.
    8. Beatrice Scheubel, 2014. "Does It Pay to Be a Woman?: Labour Demand Effects of Maternity-Related Job Protection and Replacement Incomes," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 685, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    9. Nele E. Franz, 2014. "Maternity Leave and Its Consequences for Subsequent Careers in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 722, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. repec:spr:jlabrs:v:51:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s12651-017-0230-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Schönberg, Uta, 2008. "Does the IABS reliably identify maternity leave taking?," FDZ Methodenreport 200803_en, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    12. Katharine G. Abraham & John C. Haltiwanger & Kristin Sandusky & James Spletzer, 2016. "The Consequences of Long-Term Unemployment: Evidence from Linked Survey and Administrative Data," NBER Working Papers 22665, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Steven J. Davis & John Haltiwanger, 2014. "Labor Market Fluidity and Economic Performance," NBER Working Papers 20479, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Bechara, Peggy, 2012. "Gender Segregation and Gender Wage Differences during the Early Labour Market Career," Ruhr Economic Papers 352, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.

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