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Time Out of Work and Skill Depreciation

Author

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  • Edin, Per-Anders

    (Department of Economics)

  • Gustavsson, Magnus

    (Department of Economics)

Abstract

This paper investigates the role of skill depreciation in the relationship between work interruptions and subsequent wages. Using a unique longitudinal dataset, the Swedish part of the International Adult Literacy Survey, we are able to analyze changes in literacy skills for individuals as a function of time out of work. In general, we find statistically strong evidence on a negative relationship between work interruptions and skills. Our analysis suggests that depreciation of general (literacy) skills is economically significant. Our estimates imply that a full year of non-employment is associated with skill losses that are equivalent to moving 5 percentiles down the skill distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Edin, Per-Anders & Gustavsson, Magnus, 2004. "Time Out of Work and Skill Depreciation," Working Paper Series 2004:14, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:uunewp:2004_014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Work interruptions; Skill depreciation; Unemployment; Wage differentials;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J69 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Other

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