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The wage impact of undocumented workers

Author

Listed:
  • Hotchkiss, Julie L.
  • Quispe-Agnoli, Myriam
  • Rios-Avila, Fernando

Abstract

Using administrative, individual-level, longitudinal data from the state of Georgia, this paper finds that a documented worker employed by a firm that hires undocumented workers can expect to earn 0.15 percent less than if employed by a firm that does not hire undocumented workers. However, in sectors where there are opportunities for task specialization and benefits from communication skills, documented workers can expect to earn a wage premium of less than 1 percent from being employed at a firm that also hires undocumented workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Quispe-Agnoli, Myriam & Rios-Avila, Fernando, 2012. "The wage impact of undocumented workers," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2012-04, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2012-04
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    File URL: http://www.frbatlanta.org/documents/pubs/wp/wp1204.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & Mary Beth Walker, 2017. "Impact of first birth career interruption on earnings: evidence from administrative data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(35), pages 3509-3522, July.
    2. Julie L. Hotchkiss & Myriam Quispe-Agnoli, 2009. "Employer monopsony power in the labor market for undocumented workers," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2009-14, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    3. Fernando Rios-Avila, 2013. "Feasible Estimation of Linear Models with N-fixed Effects," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_782, Levy Economics Institute.

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