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IRCA's impact on the occupational concentration and mobility of newly-legalized Mexican men

Author

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  • Sherrie A. Kossoudji

    (The Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations, Economics Department/School of Social Work, 421 Victor Vaughn Building, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2054, USA Economics Program and National Centre for Development Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia)

  • Deborah A. Cobb-Clark

    (The Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations, Economics Department/School of Social Work, 421 Victor Vaughn Building, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2054, USA Economics Program and National Centre for Development Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia)

Abstract

We examine the occupational concentration and mobility of a group of unauthorized Mexican men who received amnesty under IRCA to shed light on the role of legal status in the assimilation process. Initially these men are concentrated in a small number of traditional migrant jobs. Although their occupational mobility rate is high, it partly represents churning through these same occupations. When we consider the direction - either upward or downward - of occupational change, we find that English language ability and the characteristics of the occupation, itself, are strongly correlated with mobility before legalization. After legalization, few characteristics surpass in importance the common experience of having received amnesty.

Suggested Citation

  • Sherrie A. Kossoudji & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark, 2000. "IRCA's impact on the occupational concentration and mobility of newly-legalized Mexican men," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 13(1), pages 81-98.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:13:y:2000:i:1:p:81-98
    Note: Received: 22 July 1997/Accepted: 2 February 1999 received amnesty under IRCA to shed light on the role of legal status in the assimilation process. Initially these men are concentrated in a small number of traditional migrant jobs. Although their occupational mobility rate is high, it partly represents churning through these same occupations. When we consider the direction - either upward or downward - of occupational change, we find that English language ability and the characteristics of the occupation, itself, are strongly correlated with mobility before legalization. After legalization, few characteristics surpass in importance the common experience of having received amnesty.
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    Cited by:

    1. Blau, Francine D. & Kahn, Lawrence M., 2012. "Immigration and the Distribution of Incomes," IZA Discussion Papers 6921, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Altangerel, Khulan & van Ours, Jan C., 2017. "U.S. Immigration Reform and the Dynamics of Mexican Migration," CEPR Discussion Papers 12032, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Julie L. Hotchkiss & Myriam Quispe-Agnoli & Fernando Rios-Avila, 2012. "The wage impact of undocumented workers," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2012-04, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    4. Roth, Benjamin J. & Grace, Breanne L., 2015. "Falling through the cracks: The paradox of post-release services for unaccompanied child migrants," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 244-252.
    5. Carlo Devillanova & Francesco Fasani & Tommaso Frattini, 2014. "Employment of Undocumented Immigrants and the Prospect of Legal Status: Evidence from an Amnesty Program," Development Working Papers 367, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 26 Jun 2014.
    6. Enrique Fernández-Macías & Rafael Grande & Alberto Rey Poveda & José-Ignacio Antón, 2015. "Employment and Occupational Mobility among Recently Arrived Immigrants: The Spanish Case 1997–2007," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 34(2), pages 243-277, April.
    7. Claire E. Altman & Colleen M. Heflin & Chaegyung Jun & James D. Bachmeier, 2021. "Material Hardship Among Immigrants in the United States: Variation by Citizenship, Legal Status, and Origin in the 1996–2008 SIPP," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 40(3), pages 363-399, June.
    8. Chi, Miao & Drewianka, Scott, 2014. "How much is a green card worth? Evidence from Mexican men who marry women born in the U.S," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 103-116.
    9. Francesco Fasani, 2015. "Understanding the Role of Immigrants’ Legal Status: Evidence from Policy Experiments," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 61(3-4), pages 722-763.
    10. Silvia Helena Barcellos, 2010. "Legalization and the Economic Status of Immigrants," Working Papers 754, RAND Corporation.
    11. Magris, Francesco & Russo, Giuseppe, 2016. "Fiscal Revenues and Commitment in Immigration Amnesties," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 75-90.
    12. Fabio Méndez & Facundo Sepúlveda & Nieves Valdés, 2016. "Legalization and human capital accumulation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(3), pages 721-756, July.
    13. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Cynthia Bansak, 2011. "The Impact of Amnesty on Labor Market Outcomes: A Panel Study Using the Legalized Population Survey," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(3), pages 443-471, July.
    14. Scott Baker, 2013. "Effects of Immigrant Legalization on Crime: The 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act," Discussion Papers 12-012, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    15. Silvia Helena Barcellos, 2010. "Legalization and the Economic Status of Immigrants," Working Papers WR-754, RAND Corporation.
    16. Ira N. Gang & Myeong-Su Yun, 2007. "Immigration Amnesty and Immigrant's Earnings," Research in Labor Economics, in: Barry R. Chiswick (ed.), Immigration, volume 27, pages 273-309, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    17. Rebecca Lessem, 2018. "Mexico–U.S. Immigration: Effects of Wages and Border Enforcement," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 85(4), pages 2353-2388.
    18. Khulan Altangerel & Jan C. Ours, 2017. "U.S. Immigration Reform and the Migration Dynamics of Mexican Males," De Economist, Springer, vol. 165(4), pages 463-485, December.
    19. Sherrie A. Kossoudji, 2016. "What are the consequences of regularizing undocumented immigrants?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 296-296, September.
    20. Altangerel, Khulan & van Ours, Jan, 2017. "U.S. immigration reform and the migration dynamics of Mexican males," Other publications TiSEM ed2fd098-2862-4d6a-9909-e, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    21. Lofstrom, Magnus & Hill, Laura E. & Hayes, Joseph, 2010. "Did Employer Sanctions Lose Their Bite? Labor Market Effects of Immigrant Legalization," IZA Discussion Papers 4972, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    22. Antonio Caparrós Ruiz & Mª Lucía Navarro Gómez, 2010. "Movilidad ocupacional de los inmigrantes en España," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 5, in: María Jesús Mancebón-Torrubia & Domingo P. Ximénez-de-Embún & José María Gómez-Sancho & Gregorio Gim (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 5, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 44, pages 873-890, Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    23. Tim Krieger & Steffen Minter, 2007. "Immigration amnesties in the southern EU member states - a challenge for the entire EU?," Working Papers CIE 6, Paderborn University, CIE Center for International Economics.
    24. Ying Pan, 2012. "The Impact of Legal Status on Immigrants’ Earnings and Human Capital: Evidence from the IRCA 1986," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 119-142, June.
    25. Selda Dudu, 2018. "International Migration to Seville," Border Crossing, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 8(2), pages 355-378, July-Dece.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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