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Population, Labour Force, and Long-term Economic Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Frank T. Denton
  • Byron G. Spencer

Abstract

The Canadian population is aging as the children of the "baby boom" move into and through middle age and then on toward the retirement years. The "baby bust" that followed the boom has slowed the rate of population growth and reduced sharply the supply of young people entering the labour force. The rates of participation of women in the labour force are now approaching those of men and little can be expected in the way of continuing further growth from that source. Immigration has thus taken on an important role in determining the rates of population and labour force growth. We explore these and related issues and draw out their implications for Canada's economic growth prospects.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank T. Denton & Byron G. Spencer, 1997. "Population, Labour Force, and Long-term Economic Growth," Independence and Economic Security of the Older Population Research Papers 25, McMaster University.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcm:iesopp:25
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    File URL: http://socserv.socsci.mcmaster.ca/iesop/papers/iesop_25.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Frank T. Denton & Christine H. Feaver & Byron G. Spencer, 1997. "Immigration, Labour Force, and the Age Structure of the Population," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 335, McMaster University.
    2. Frank T. Denton & Christine H. Feaver & Byron G. Spencer, 1997. "PMEDS-D Users' Manual," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 326, McMaster University.
    3. Frank T. Denton & Byron G. Spencer, 1997. "Demographic Trends, Labour Force Participation, and Long-term Growth," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 334, McMaster University.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Manamba EPAPHRA, 2016. "Nonlinearities in Inflation and Growth Nexus: The Case of Tanzania," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 471-512, September.
    2. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Quispe-Agnoli, Myriam & Rios-Avila, Fernando, 2012. "The wage impact of undocumented workers," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2012-04, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    3. Frank T. Denton & Christine H. Feaver & Byron G. Spencer, 2005. "Population Aging in Canada: Software for Exploring the Implications for the Labour Force and the Productive Capacity of the Economy," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 403, McMaster University.
    4. Manamba EPAPHRA & John MASSAWE, 2016. "Investment and Economic Growth: An Empirical Analysis for Tanzania," Turkish Economic Review, KSP Journals, vol. 3(4), pages 578-609, December.
    5. William Scarth, 2007. "A Note on Income Distribution and Growth," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 421, McMaster University.
    6. Nicole Van Der Gaag & Joop Beer, 2015. "From Demographic Dividend to Demographic Burden: The Impact of Population Ageing on Economic Growth in Europe," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 106(1), pages 94-109, February.
    7. William Scarth, 2007. "A Note on Income Distribution and Growth," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 213, McMaster University.
    8. William Scarth, 2003. "Population Aging, Productivity, and Growth in Living Standards," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 380, McMaster University.
    9. P. C. Albuquerque, 2015. "Demographics and the Portuguese economic growth," Working Papers Department of Economics 2015/17, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    10. William Scarth, 2003. "Population Aging, Productivity, and Growth in Living Standards," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 90, McMaster University.
    11. Julie L. Hotchkiss & Myriam Quispe-Agnoli, 2008. "The labor market experience and impact of undocumented workers," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2008-07, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    population; labour force; immigration; baby boom; economic growth;

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

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