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Female labour force intermittency and current earnings: switching regression model with unknown sample selection

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  • Julie Hotchkiss
  • M. Melinda Pitts

Abstract

Using the Health and Retirement Survey from the USA, this paper finds a 16% selectivity-corrected wage penalty among women who engage in intermittent labour market activity. This penalty is experienced at a low level of intermittent activity, but appears to not play an important role in a woman's decision to undertake such activity. In addition, employer preferences appear to play a larger role than human capital atrophy in the determination of the wage penalty.

Suggested Citation

  • Julie Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2005. "Female labour force intermittency and current earnings: switching regression model with unknown sample selection," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(5), pages 545-560.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:37:y:2005:i:5:p:545-560
    DOI: 10.1080/0003684042000307003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dickens, William T & Lang, Kevin, 1985. "A Test of Dual Labor Market Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 792-805, September.
    2. James W. Albrecht & Per-Anders Edin & Marianne Sundström & Susan B. Vroman, 1999. "Career Interruptions and Subsequent Earnings: A Reexamination Using Swedish Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(2), pages 294-311.
    3. Susan L. Averett & Julie L. Hotchkiss, 1996. "Discrimination in the Payment of Full-Time Wage Premiums," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(2), pages 287-301, January.
    4. Polachek,Solomon W. & Siebert,W. Stanley, 1993. "The Economics of Earnings," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521367288, May.
    5. Idson, Todd L & Feaster, Daniel J, 1990. "A Selectivity Model of Employer-Size Wage Differentials," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(1), pages 99-122, January.
    6. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Moore, Robert E. & Rockel, Mark, 1994. "Export expansion and growth at different stages of development," MPRA Paper 9320, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Kajal Lahiri & Jae G. Song, 2000. "The effect of smoking on health using a sequential self-selection model," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(6), pages 491-511.
    8. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2003. "At What Level of Labor-Market Intermittency Are Women Penalized?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 233-237, May.
    9. Jacob Mincer & Haim Ofek, 1982. "Interrupted Work Careers: Depreciation and Restoration of Human Capital," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(1), pages 3-24.
    10. Miles Cahill & Nicolás Sánchez, 2001. "Using principal components to produce an economic and social development index: An application to Latin America and the U.S," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 29(3), pages 311-329, September.
    11. Oaxaca, Ronald L. & Ransom, Michael R., 1994. "On discrimination and the decomposition of wage differentials," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 5-21, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & Mary Beth Walker, 2017. "Impact of first birth career interruption on earnings: evidence from administrative data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(35), pages 3509-3522, July.
    2. Das, Tirthatanmoy & Polachek, Solomon, 2017. "Micro Foundations of Earnings Differences," IZA Discussion Papers 10922, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Coulson, N. Edward & Li, Herman, 2013. "Measuring the external benefits of homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 57-67.
    4. Polachek, Solomon W., 2008. "Earnings Over the Life Cycle: The Mincer Earnings Function and Its Applications," Foundations and Trends(R) in Microeconomics, now publishers, vol. 4(3), pages 165-272, April.
    5. Tang, Mingzhe & Coulson, N. Edward, 2017. "The impact of China's housing provident fund on homeownership, housing consumption and housing investment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 25-37.
    6. Julie L. Hotchkiss, 2005. "What’s up with the decline in female labor force participation?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2005-18, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    7. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & Mary Beth Walker, 2008. "Working with children? the probability of mothers exiting the workforce at time of birth," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2008-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

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