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The Definition of Part-Time Employment: A Switching Regression Model with Unknown Sample Selection

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  • Hotchkiss, Julie L

Abstract

Rejecting the standard less-than-thirty-five-hours-per-week categorization of part-time workers, this paper offers an empirically-justified definition of the part-time employed. The definition is based on the distinction through wage payments that employers make between a high-hours (full-time) and a low-hours (part-time) group of workers. A switching regression model of wage equations with deterministic, but unknown, sample selection is estimated resulting in a significant split between high-hours and low-hours workers that is higher than the standard definition. Wage differentials are calculated and decomposed, and estimates from the structural choice model are presented. Copyright 1991 by Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania and the Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association.

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  • Hotchkiss, Julie L, 1991. "The Definition of Part-Time Employment: A Switching Regression Model with Unknown Sample Selection," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 32(4), pages 899-917, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:32:y:1991:i:4:p:899-917
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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Aaronson & Eric French, 2004. "The Effect of Part-Time Work on Wages: Evidence from the Social Security Rules," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(2), pages 329-352, April.
    2. M. Hsu & B-L. Chen, 2000. "Labor productivity of small and large manufacturing firms: the case of Taiwan," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(3), pages 270-283, July.
    3. Fernández-Kranz, Daniel & Rodríguez-Planas, Núria, 2011. "The part-time pay penalty in a segmented labor market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 591-606, October.
    4. Barry T. Hirsch, 2005. "Why Do Part-Time Workers Earn Less? The Role of Worker and Job Skills," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 58(4), pages 525-551, July.
    5. Paswel P. Marenya & Christopher B. Barrett, 2009. "Soil quality and fertilizer use rates among smallholder farmers in western Kenya," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(5), pages 561-572, September.
    6. Alonso-Ortiz, Jorge, 2014. "Social security and retirement across the OECD," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 300-316.
    7. M. Melinda Pitts, 2002. "Why choose women's work if it pays less? A structural model of occupational choice," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2002-30, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    8. Cadot, Olivier & Dutoit, Laure & Olarreaga, Marcelo, 2005. "How Costly is it for Poor Farmers to Lift Themselves out of Subsistence?," CEPR Discussion Papers 5392, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "The Role of Labor Market Intermittency in Explaining Gender Wage Differentials," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 417-421, May.
    10. Marenya, Paswel Phiri & Barrett, Christopher B., 2009. "The effect of soil quality on fertilizer use rates among smallholder farmers in western Kenya," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51671, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    11. Prodromídis Pródromos-Ioánnis, 2010. "Analysing Local Employment and Unemployment in Greece Under Conventional Zoning Regimes and Partitions Extracted from the Data," European Spatial Research and Policy, De Gruyter Open, vol. 17(1), pages 61-91, June.
    12. K.R.Shanmugam & S.Madheswaran, 2004. "Wage Differentials Between Union and Non-union Workers: An Econometric Analysis," Econometric Society 2004 Far Eastern Meetings 413, Econometric Society.
    13. Christine Siegwarth Meyer & Swati Mukerjee, 2007. "Investigating Dual Labor Market Theory For Women," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 33(3), pages 301-316, Summer.
    14. Cadot, Olivier & Dutoit, Laure & Olarreaga, Marcelo, 2006. "How costly is it for poor farmers to lift themselves out of poverty?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3881, The World Bank.
    15. Amy Rehder Harris & John Sabelhaus, 2003. "Projecting Longitudinal Earnings Patterns for Long-Run Policy Analysis: Technical Paper 2003-02," Working Papers 14364, Congressional Budget Office.
    16. Massa, Massimo & Žaldokas, Alminas, 2014. "Investor base and corporate borrowing: Evidence from international bonds," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 95-110.
    17. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2003. "Female labor force intermittency and current earnings: a switching regression model with unknown sample selection," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-33, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    18. Prodromídis, Pródromos-Ioánnis K., 2012. "Modeling male and female employment policy in Greece from local data," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 823-839.
    19. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Moore, Robert E. & Rockel, Mark, 1994. "Export expansion and growth at different stages of development," MPRA Paper 9320, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Lettau, Michael K., 1997. "Compensation in part-time jobs versus full-time jobs What if the job is the same?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 101-106, September.

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