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What’s up with the decline in female labor force participation?

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  • Julie L. Hotchkiss

Abstract

This paper determines that the weaker positive pull of education into the labor market and weaker labor market conditions are the observed factors that contributed the most to the decline in the labor force participation rate (LFPR) between 2000 and 2004 among women ages 25–54. As is typical, however, unobserved factors contributed more than any single or combination of observed factors. Furthermore, if the unemployment rate rebounded to its level in 2000, the LFPR would still be 1.4 percentage points lower than it was in 2000.

Suggested Citation

  • Julie L. Hotchkiss, 2005. "What’s up with the decline in female labor force participation?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2005-18, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2005-18
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    File URL: http://www.frbatlanta.org/filelegacydocs/wp0518.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Katharine L. Bradbury, 2005. "Additional slack in the economy: the poor recovery in labor force participation during this business cycle," Public Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. Julie L. Hotchkiss, 2003. "The Labor Market Experience of Workers with Disabilities: The ADA and Beyond," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number lmewd, November.
    3. Julie Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2005. "Female labour force intermittency and current earnings: switching regression model with unknown sample selection," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(5), pages 545-560.
    4. Jonathan Gruber, 2000. "Disability Insurance Benefits and Labor Supply," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(6), pages 1162-1183, December.
    5. Katharine Bradbury & Jane Katz, 2005. "Women's rise: a work in progress," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 1, pages 58-67.
    6. Martha J. Bailey, 2006. "More Power to the Pill: The Impact of Contraceptive Freedom on Women's Life Cycle Labor Supply," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(1), pages 289-320.
    7. Robert E. Moore & Mary Mathewes Kassis & Julie L. Hotchkiss, 1997. "Running hard and falling behind: A welfare analysis of two-earner families," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 10(3), pages 237-250.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ivan O. KITOV, 2008. "The Driving Force of Labor Force Participation in Developed Countries," Journal of Applied Economic Sciences, Spiru Haret University, Faculty of Financial Management and Accounting Craiova, vol. 3(3(5)_Fall), pages 203-222.
    2. William Poole, 2006. "U.S. labor input in coming years," Speech 107, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    3. Evridiki Tsounta, 2006. "Why Are Women Working So Much More in Canada? An International Perspective," IMF Working Papers 06/92, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Bruce C. Fallick & Jonathan F. Pingle, 2006. "A cohort-based model of labor force participation," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2007-09, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    5. Todd E. Clark & Taisuke Nakata, 2006. "The trend growth rate of employment : past, present, and future," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q I, pages 43-85.

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