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The Female Labor Force and Long-Run Development: The American Experience in Comparative Perspective

In: Human Capital in History: The American Record

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  • Claudia Olivetti

Abstract

This paper provides additional evidence on the U-shaped relationship between the process of economic development and women's labor force participation. The experience of the United States is studied in a comparative perspective relative to a sample of rich economies observed over the period 1890-2005. The analysis confirms the existence of a U-shaped female labor supply function, coming from both cross-country and within country variation. Further analysis of a large cross section of economies observed over the post-WWII period suggests that the timing of a country's transition to a modern path of economic development affects the shape of women's labor supply.
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Suggested Citation

  • Claudia Olivetti, 2014. "The Female Labor Force and Long-Run Development: The American Experience in Comparative Perspective," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital in History: The American Record, pages 161-197 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:12892
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Doepke, M. & Tertilt, M., 2016. "Families in Macroeconomics," Handbook of Macroeconomics, Elsevier.
    2. repec:aic:revebs:y:2017:j:19:doganb is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Rim Berahab & Zineb Bouba & Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2017. "Egalité de genre, politiques publiques et croissance économique au Maroc," Books & Reports, OCP Policy Center, number 13.
    4. Jeremy Greenwood & Nezih Guner & Guillaume Vandenbroucke, 2015. "Family Economics Writ Large," Economie d'Avant Garde Research Reports 26, Economie d'Avant Garde.
    5. Rossin-Slater, Maya & Wüst, Miriam, 2016. "What is the Added Value of Preschool? Long-Term Impacts and Interactions with a Health Intervention," IZA Discussion Papers 10254, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Piotr Koryś & Maciej Tymiński, 2015. "Occupational structure in the Polish territories at the turn of the 20th (1895-1900) century," Working Papers 2015-09, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    7. Maurer, Stephan E. & Potlogea, Andrei, 2014. "Fueling the gender gap? Oil and women's labor and marriage market outcomes," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60351, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Leonardo Gasparini & Mariana Marchionni, 2015. "Bridging Gender Gaps? The Rise and Deceleration of Female Labor Force Participation in Latin America: An overview," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0185, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    9. Pauline Grosjean & Rose Khattar, 2014. "It's Raining Men! Hallelujah?," Discussion Papers 2014-29, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    10. Rense Nieuwenhuis & Wim Van Lancker & Diego Collado & Bea Cantillon, 2016. "Has the potential for compensating poverty by women’s employment growth been depleted?," ImPRovE Working Papers 16/02, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    11. repec:aea:jeclit:v:55:y:2017:i:4:p:1346-1434 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Siegmann, K.A. & Majid, H., 2014. "Empowering growth in Pakistan?," ISS Working Papers - General Series 595, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    13. Ewa Lechman, 2014. "Female labor force participation and economic growth– re-examination of U-shaped curve," GUT FME Working Paper Series A 21, Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology.
    14. Maya Rossin-Slater & Miriam Wüst, 2016. "What is the Added Value of Preschool? Long-term Impacts and Interactions with a Health Intervention," NBER Working Papers 22700, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Matias Busso & Dario Romero Fonseca, 2015. "Female Labor Force Participation in Latin America: Patterns and Explanations," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0187, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • N11 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - U.S.; Canada: Pre-1913
    • N12 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - U.S.; Canada: 1913-

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