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Jobless Recoveries and Gender Biased Technological Change

Author

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  • Aysegul Sahin

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Stefania Albanesi

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

Abstract

The strong positive correlation between output and employment is probably one of the most widely accepted stylized facts about business cycles. However, the recoveries following the 1991-92, 2001, and 2007-09 recessions all turned out to be exceptions to this widely accepted pattern. These episodes are generally referred to as "jobless recoveries" since output growth was accompanied by slow employment growth or even continued employment decline in the aftermath of the recession. In this paper, we propose a new explanation for the onset of jobless recoveries, linking it to the behavior of female labor force participation and gender-biased technological change.

Suggested Citation

  • Aysegul Sahin & Stefania Albanesi, 2013. "Jobless Recoveries and Gender Biased Technological Change," 2013 Meeting Papers 985, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed013:985
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    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2013/paper_985.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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