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Male-biased Demand Shocks and Women’s Labor Force Participation: Evidence from Large Oil Field Discoveries

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  • Maurer, Stephan
  • Potlogea, Andrei

Abstract

We study whether male-biased demand shocks affect women's labor force participation (LFP), using major oil field discoveries in the US South between 1900 and 1940. We find that oil wealth has a zero net effect on female LFP due to two opposing channels. Increased male wages lead to a higher marriage rate of young women, which could have depressed female LFP. But at the same time, oil wealth also increases demand for female labor in services, which counterbalances the marriage effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Maurer, Stephan & Potlogea, Andrei, 2017. "Male-biased Demand Shocks and Women’s Labor Force Participation: Evidence from Large Oil Field Discoveries," VfS Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168143, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc17:168143
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    2. Anja Tolonen, 2019. "Endogenous Gender Roles: Evidence from Africa’s Gold Mining Industry," OxCarre Working Papers 209, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    3. Bennett, Patrick & Ravetti, Chiara & Wong, Po Yin, 2020. "Losing in a Boom: Long-term Consequences of a Local Economic Shock for Female Labour Market Outcomes," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 3/2020, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    4. Maurer, Stephan E., 2018. "Oil discoveries and education spending in the postbellum south," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 88677, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Brodeur, Abel & Haddad, Joanne, 2018. "Institutions, Attitudes and LGBT: Evidence from the Gold Rush," IZA Discussion Papers 11957, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Maurer, Stephan E., 2019. "Oil discoveries and education provision in the Postbellum South," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).
    7. Jubril Animashaun & Ada Wossink, 2020. "Patriarchy, Pandemics and the Gendered Resource Curse Thesis: Evidence from Petroleum Geology," Economics Discussion Paper Series 2006, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    8. Bilal Nabeel Falah & Marcelo Bérgolo & Arwa Abu Hashhash & Mohammad Hattawy & Iman Saadeh, 2019. "The Effect of Labor-Demand Shocks on Women’s Participation in the Labor Force: Evidence from Palestine," Working Papers PMMA 2019-08, PEP-PMMA.
    9. Au Yong Lyn, Audrey, 2020. "Male employment and female intra-household decision-making: a Mexican gold mining case study," Munich Reprints in Economics 75733, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    10. Aragón, Fernando M. & Rud, Juan Pablo & Toews, Gerhard, 2018. "Resource shocks, employment, and gender: Evidence from the collapse of the UK coal industry," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 54-67.

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    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • N50 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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