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Local Industrial Shocks and Infant Mortality

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  • Anja Tolonen

Abstract

Does industrial development change gender norms? This is the first paper to causally Anja Texplore the local effects of a continent-wide exogenous expansion of a modern industry on gender norms. The identification strategy relies on plausibly exogenous temporal and spatial variation in gold mining in Africa. The establishment of an industrial-scale mine changes local gender norms: justification of domestic violence decreases by 19%, women have better access to healthcare, and are 31% more likely to work in the service sector. The effects happen alongside rapid economic growth. The findings are robust to assumptions about trends, distance, and migration, and withstand a spatial randomization test. The results show that entrenched gender norms can change rapidly in the presence of economic development.

Suggested Citation

  • Anja Tolonen, 2018. "Local Industrial Shocks and Infant Mortality," OxCarre Working Papers 209, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:oxcrwp:209
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    Cited by:

    1. Anja Tolonen, 2018. "Local Industrial Shocks and Infant Mortality," OxCarre Working Papers 208, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    2. repec:eee:deveco:v:139:y:2019:i:c:p:1-16 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender norms; female empowerment; local industrial development; gold minig=ng;

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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