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Bride Price and Female Education

Author

Listed:
  • Nava Ashraf
  • Natalie Bau
  • Nathan Nunn

    ()

  • Alessandra Voena

Abstract

The paper examines how the effects of school construction on girls’ education vary with a widely-practiced marriage custom called bride price, which is a payment made by the husband and/or his family to the wife’s parents at marriage. It began by developing a model of educational choice with and without bride price. The model generates a number of predictions that was tested in two countries that have had large-scale school construction projects, Indonesia and Zambia. Consistent with the model, it was found that for groups that practice the custom of bride price, the value of bride price payments that the parents receive tend to increase with their daughter’s education. As a consequence, the probability of a girl being educated is higher among bride price groups. The model also predicts that families from bride price groups will be the most responsive to policies, like school construction, that are aimed at increasing female education.

Suggested Citation

  • Nava Ashraf & Natalie Bau & Nathan Nunn & Alessandra Voena, 2018. "Bride Price and Female Education," Working Papers id:12917, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:12917
    Note: Institutional Papers
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sara Lowes & Nathan Nunn, 2017. "Bride price and the wellbeing of women," WIDER Working Paper Series 131, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Anja Tolonen, 2018. "Local Industrial Shocks and Infant Mortality," OxCarre Working Papers 208, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    3. Anukriti, S & Dasgupta, Shatanjaya, 2017. "Marriage Markets in Developing Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 10556, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Michaela Slotwinski & Alois Stutzer, 2018. "Women Leaving the Playpen: The Emancipating Role of Female Suffrage," CESifo Working Paper Series 7002, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. repec:eee:deveco:v:135:y:2018:i:c:p:449-460 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:bla:ehsrev:v:71:y:2018:i:3:p:965-994 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Jean-Marie Baland & Roberta Ziparo, 2017. "Intra-household bargaining in poor countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 108, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Friedman-Sokuler, Naomi & Justman, Moshe, 2019. "Gender, culture and STEM: Counter-intuitive patterns in Arab society," GLO Discussion Paper Series 307, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    eSS; bride price; culture; marriage customs; education; girl education; school construction project; development policy; female education; development programs; traditional marriage customs; cost of education; educational investment; educational attainments; enrolment.;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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