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Bride Price and Female Education

Author

Listed:
  • Nava Ashraf
  • Natalie Bau
  • Nathan Nunn

    ()

  • Alessandra Voena

Abstract

The paper examines how the effects of school construction on girls’ education vary with a widely-practiced marriage custom called bride price, which is a payment made by the husband and/or his family to the wife’s parents at marriage. It began by developing a model of educational choice with and without bride price. The model generates a number of predictions that was tested in two countries that have had large-scale school construction projects, Indonesia and Zambia. Consistent with the model, it was found that for groups that practice the custom of bride price, the value of bride price payments that the parents receive tend to increase with their daughter’s education. As a consequence, the probability of a girl being educated is higher among bride price groups. The model also predicts that families from bride price groups will be the most responsive to policies, like school construction, that are aimed at increasing female education.

Suggested Citation

  • Nava Ashraf & Natalie Bau & Nathan Nunn & Alessandra Voena, 2018. "Bride Price and Female Education," Working Papers id:12917, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:12917
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    Cited by:

    1. Akyol, Pelin & Mocan, Naci, 2020. "Education and Consanguineous Marriage," IZA Discussion Papers 13985, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Sara Lowes & Nathan Nunn, 2017. "Bride price and the wellbeing of women," WIDER Working Paper Series 131, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Lucia Corno & Nicole Hildebrandt & Alessandra Voena, 2020. "Age of Marriage, Weather Shocks, and the Direction of Marriage Payments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 88(3), pages 879-915, May.
    4. Nicole Jonker & Anneke Kosse, 2020. "The interplay of financial education, financial literacy, financial inclusion and financial, stability: Any lessons for the current Big Tech era?," DNB Working Papers 692, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    5. Bhalotra, Sonia & Chakravarty, Abhishek & Gulesci, Selim, 2020. "The price of gold: Dowry and death in India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 143(C).
    6. Anja Tolonen, 2019. "Endogenous Gender Roles: Evidence from Africa’s Gold Mining Industry," OxCarre Working Papers 209, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    7. Jorge Garcia Hombrados, 2018. "Empirical essays on development economics," Economics PhD Theses 0318, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    8. Anukriti, S & Dasgupta, Shatanjaya, 2017. "Marriage Markets in Developing Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 10556, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Olivier Bargain & Jordan Loper & Roberta Ziparo, 2020. "Traditional Norms, Access to Divorce and Women’s Empowerment: Evidence from Indonesia," Bordeaux Economics Working Papers 2020-14, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée (GREThA).
    10. Friedman-Sokuler, Naomi & Justman, Moshe, 2020. "Gender, culture and STEM: Counter-intuitive patterns in Arab society," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 74(C).
    11. Brodeur, Abel & Mabeu, Marie Christelle & Pongou, Roland, 2020. "Ancestral Norms, Legal Origins, and Female Empowerment," IZA Discussion Papers 13105, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Ahmed Elsayed & Olivier Marie, 2020. "Less School (Costs), More (Female) Education? Lessons from Egypt Reducing Years of Compulsory Schooling," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 20-037/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    13. Michaela Slotwinski & Alois Stutzer, 2018. "Women Leaving the Playpen: The Emancipating Role of Female Suffrage," CESifo Working Paper Series 7002, CESifo.
    14. Saqib Jafarey & Ram Mainali & Gabriel Montes‐Rojas, 2020. "Age at marriage, social norms, and female education in Nepal," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(3), pages 878-909, August.
    15. Dillon, Brian & Voena, Alessandra, 2018. "Widows' land rights and agricultural investment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 449-460.
    16. Bhashkar Mazumder & Maria Fernanda Rosales & Margaret Triyana, 2019. "Social Interventions, Health and Wellbeing: The Long-Term and Intergenerational Effects of a School Construction Program," Working Paper Series WP-2019-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    17. Jean-Marie Baland & Roberta Ziparo, 2017. "Intra-household bargaining in poor countries," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2017-108, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    18. Michiel De Haas & Ewout Frankema, 2018. "Gender, ethnicity, and unequal opportunity in colonial Uganda: European influences, African realities, and the pitfalls of parish register data," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(3), pages 965-994, August.
    19. Mariko J. Klasing & Petros Milionis, 2020. "The international epidemiological transition and the education gender gap," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 37-86, March.
    20. Dawoon Jung & Tushar Bharati & Seungwoo Chin, 2020. "Does Education Affect Time Preference? Evidence from Indonesia," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 20-17, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    21. Jean-Marie Baland & Roberta Ziparo, 2017. "Intra-household bargaining in poor countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 108, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    22. Sara Lowes & Nathan Nunn, 2017. "Bride price and the well-being of women," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2017-131, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    eSS; bride price; culture; marriage customs; education; girl education; school construction project; development policy; female education; development programs; traditional marriage customs; cost of education; educational investment; educational attainments; enrolment.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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