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Are Investments in Daughters Lower When Daughters Move Away?

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Kevane

    (Department of Economics, Santa Clara University)

  • David I. Levine

    (Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley)

Abstract

In much of the developing world daughters receive lower education and other investments than do their brothers, and may even be so devalued as to suffer differential mortality. Daughter disadvantage may be due in part to social norms that prescribe that daughters move away from their natal family upon marriage, a practice known as virilocality. We evaluate the effects of virilocality on female disadvantage using data from the Indonesia Family Life Survey. We find little support for the hypothesis. There is no evidence that the overall pattern of rough equality in the treatment of boys and girls in Indonesia masks differences according to post-marital residential practice. Virilocal groups do not have "missing daughters." Nor is there other evidence of son preference, such as in relatively low height for- age or education for girls and women in virilocal areas. Explanations of daughter disadvantage as due to virilocality should be subject to further scrutiny and contextualization.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Kevane & David I. Levine, 2003. "Are Investments in Daughters Lower When Daughters Move Away?," Development and Comp Systems 0303002, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0303002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kevane, Michael & Levine, David I., 2003. "Changing Status of Daughters in Indonesia," Center for International and Development Economics Research, Working Paper Series qt0b52v28f, Center for International and Development Economics Research, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    2. Anderson, K.S., 2000. "The Economics of Dowry Payments in Pakistan," Discussion Paper 2000-82, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    3. Thomas, Duncan & Contreras, Dante & Frankerberg, Elizabeth, 2002. "Distribution of power within the household and child health," MPRA Paper 80075, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Mar 2002.
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    1. repec:eee:cysrev:v:79:y:2017:i:c:p:263-273 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:wdevel:v:104:y:2018:i:c:p:326-335 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Firman Witoelar, 2005. "Inter-household Allocations within Extended Family: Evidence from the Indonesia Family Life Survey," Working Papers 912, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    4. Priebe, Jan, 2011. "Child Costs and the Causal Effect of Fertility on Female Labor Supply: An investigation for Indonesia 1993-2008," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 67, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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