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The local socioeconomic effects of gold mining : evidence from Ghana

Author

Listed:
  • Chuhan-Pole,Punam
  • Dabalen,Andrew L.
  • Kotsadam,Andreas
  • Sanoh,Aly
  • Tolonen,Anja Karolina
  • Chuhan-Pole,Punam
  • Dabalen,Andrew L.
  • Kotsadam,Andreas
  • Sanoh,Aly
  • Tolonen,Anja Karolina

Abstract

Ghana is experiencing its third gold rush, and this paper sheds light on the socioeconomic impacts of this rapid expansion in industrial production. The paper uses a rich data set consisting of geocoded household data combined with detailed information on gold mining activities, and conducts two types of difference-in-differences estimations that provide complementary evidence. The first is a local-level analysis that identifies an economic footprint area very close to a mine; the second is a district-level analysis that captures the fiscal channel. The results indicate that men are more likely to benefit from direct employment as miners and that women are more likely to gain from indirect employment opportunities in services, although these results are imprecisely measured. Long-established households gain access to infrastructure, such as electricity and radios. Migrants living close to mines are less likely to have access to electricity and the incidence of diarrheal diseases is higher among migrant children. Overall, however, infant mortality rates decrease significantly in mining communities.

Suggested Citation

  • Chuhan-Pole,Punam & Dabalen,Andrew L. & Kotsadam,Andreas & Sanoh,Aly & Tolonen,Anja Karolina & Chuhan-Pole,Punam & Dabalen,Andrew L. & Kotsadam,Andreas & Sanoh,Aly & Tolonen,Anja Karolina, 2015. "The local socioeconomic effects of gold mining : evidence from Ghana," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7250, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7250
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fernando M. Arag?n & Juan Pablo Rud, 2013. "Natural Resources and Local Communities: Evidence from a Peruvian Gold Mine," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 1-25, May.
    2. Marcel Fafchamps & Michael Koelle & Forhad Shilpi, 2017. "Gold mining and proto-urbanization: recent evidence from Ghana," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(5), pages 975-1008.
    3. Francesco Caselli & Guy Michaels, 2013. "Do Oil Windfalls Improve Living Standards? Evidence from Brazil," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 208-238, January.
    4. Frederick van der Ploeg, 2011. "Natural Resources: Curse or Blessing?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(2), pages 366-420, June.
    5. Wilson, Nicholas, 2012. "Economic booms and risky sexual behavior: Evidence from Zambian copper mining cities," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 797-812.
    6. Frankel, Jeffrey A., 2010. "The Natural Resource Curse: A Survey," Scholarly Articles 4454156, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
    7. Guy Michaels, 2011. "The Long Term Consequences of Resource‐Based Specialisation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(551), pages 31-57, March.
    8. Flatø, Martin & Kotsadam, Andreas, 2014. "Droughts and Gender Bias in Infant Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa," Memorandum 02/2014, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Deininger, Klaus & Xia, Fang, 2016. "Quantifying Spillover Effects from Large Land-based Investment: The Case of Mozambique," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 227-241.
    2. Punam Chuhan-Pole & Andrew L. Dabalen & Bryan Christopher Land, 2017. "Mining in Africa
      [L'exploitation minière en Afrique]
      ," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 26110, September.
    3. World Bank, 2015. "Socioeconomic Impact of Mining on Local Communities in Africa," World Bank Other Operational Studies 22489, The World Bank.
    4. repec:eee:wdevel:v:107:y:2018:i:c:p:151-162 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:wdevel:v:109:y:2018:i:c:p:206-221 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:eee:wdevel:v:119:y:2019:i:c:p:23-39 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:eee:wdevel:v:104:y:2018:i:c:p:281-296 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Kotsadam, Andreas & Tolonen, Anja, 2016. "African Mining, Gender, and Local Employment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 325-339.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mining&Extractive Industry (Non-Energy); Primary Metals; Reproductive Health; Early Child and Children's Health; Educational Sciences;

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