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Mineral Mining and Female Employment

Author

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  • Andreas Kotsadam
  • Anja Tolonen

Abstract

We use the rapid expansion of the number of mineral mines in Sub-Saharan Africa to explore changes in local labor markets. Matching over two decades of panel data on industrial mines to survey data for half a million women and exploiting the spatial and temporal variation in the data in a difference-in-difference strategy, we find that opening of an industrial mine induces a structural shift whereby women switch from working in agriculture to services. We also find that the probability to earn cash income increases and women become less likely to work seasonally once a mine opens nearby. The results illustrate that mineral mining creates non-agricultural employment opportunities for women despite their absence frm the mining workforce. T|he spillover effects wear off with distance from mine and the effects on service employment are reversed when a mine closes.

Suggested Citation

  • Andreas Kotsadam & Anja Tolonen, 2013. "Mineral Mining and Female Employment," OxCarre Working Papers 114, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:oxcrwp:114
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    File URL: http://www.oxcarre.ox.ac.uk/files/OxCarreRP2013114.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Marcel Fafchamps & Michael Koelle & Forhad Shilpi, 2017. "Gold mining and proto-urbanization: recent evidence from Ghana," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(5), pages 975-1008.
    2. Addison,Tony & Boly,Amadou & Mveyange,Anthony Francis, 2016. "Mining and economic development : did China's WTO accession affect African local economic development ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7906, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mineral mining; female employment; Sub-Saharan Africa; local labor markets; women;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure

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