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Economic booms and risky sexual behavior: Evidence from Zambian copper mining cities

  • Wilson, Nicholas
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    Existing studies suggest that individual and household level economic shocks affect the demand for and supply of risky sex. However, little evidence exists on the effects of an aggregate shock on equilibrium risky sexual behavior. This paper examines the effects of the early twenty-first century copper boom on risky sexual behavior in Zambian copper mining cities. The results suggest that the copper boom substantially reduced rates of transactional sex and multiple partnerships in copper mining cities. These effects were partly concentrated among young adults and copper boom induced in-migration to mining cities appears to have contributed to these reductions.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167629612000963
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 31 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 6 ()
    Pages: 797-812

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:31:y:2012:i:6:p:797-812
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

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