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Women's empowerment in action: Evidence from a randomized control trial in Africa

Listed author(s):
  • Oriana Bandiera
  • Niklas Buehren
  • Robin Burgess
  • Markus Goldstein
  • Selim Gulesci
  • Imran Rasul
  • Munshi Sulaiman

Women in developing countries are disempowered relative to their contemporaries in developed countries. High youth unemployment and early marriage and childbearing interact to limit human capital investment and enforce dependence on men. In this paper we evaluate an attempt to jump-start adolescent women’s empowerment in the world’s second youngest country: Uganda. In this two-pronged intervention, adolescent girls are simultaneously provided vocational training and information on sex, reproduction and marriage. Relative to adolescents in control communities, after two years the intervention raises the likelihood that girls engage in income generating activities by 72% (mainly driven by increased participation in self-employment), and raises their monthly consumption expenditures by 41%. Teen pregnancy falls by 26%, and early entry into marriage/cohabitation falls by 58%. Strikingly, the share of girls reporting sex against their will drops from 14% to almost half that level and preferred ages of marriage and childbearing both move forward. The findings indicate that women’s economic and social empowerment can be jump-started through the combined provision of vocational and life skills, and is not necessarily held back by insurmountable constraints arising from binding social norms.

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File URL: http://www.csae.ox.ac.uk/workingpapers/pdfs/csae-wps-2014-30.pdf
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Paper provided by Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford in its series CSAE Working Paper Series with number 2014-30.

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Date of creation: 2014
Handle: RePEc:csa:wpaper:2014-30
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  14. Ozier,Owen, 2015. "The impact of secondary schooling in Kenya : a regression discontinuity analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7384, The World Bank.
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