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The Distribution of Lifetime Earnings Returns to College

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  • Nybom, Martin

    (Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University)

Abstract

I use Swedish registry data to estimate lifetime earnings returns to college and how they vary with observed and unobserved characteristics. The richness of the data also allows me to examine heterogeneity with respect to cognitive and noncognitive ability and parental earnings. Local instrumental variable analysis is used to recover marginal and average treatment effects under selection on gains. The findings support the notion of self-selection, but mainly on observed characteristics. Returns vary little with parental earnings but substantially with respect to both cognitive and noncognitive ability, thus suggesting important complementarities between formal schooling and informal skills.
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Suggested Citation

  • Nybom, Martin, 2014. "The Distribution of Lifetime Earnings Returns to College," Working Paper Series 2/2014, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sofiwp:2014_002
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthias Collischon & Kamila Cygan-Rehm & Regina T. Riphahn, 2018. "Employment Effects of Payroll Tax Subsidies," CESifo Working Paper Series 7111, CESifo.
    2. Kamhöfer, Daniel A. & Westphal, Matthias, 2017. "Fertility effects of college education: Evidence from the German educational expansion," Ruhr Economic Papers 717, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    3. Suhonen, Tuomo & Karhunen, Hannu, 2019. "The intergenerational effects of parental higher education: Evidence from changes in university accessibility," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 195-217.
    4. Daniel A Kamhöfer & Hendrik Schmitz & Matthias Westphal, 2019. "Heterogeneity in Marginal Non-Monetary Returns to Higher Education," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 205-244.
    5. Giesecke, Matthias & Schuss, Eric, 2019. "Heterogeneity in marginal returns to language training of immigrants," Ruhr Economic Papers 812, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    6. Thomas Cornelissen & Christian Dustmann & Anna Raute & Uta Schönberg, 2018. "Who Benefits from Universal Child Care? Estimating Marginal Returns to Early Child Care Attendance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 126(6), pages 2356-2409.
    7. Cornelissen, Thomas & Dustmann, Christian & Raute, Anna & Schönberg, Uta, 2016. "From LATE to MTE: Alternative methods for the evaluation of policy interventions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 47-60.
    8. Stenberg, Anders & Westerlund, Olle, 2016. "Flexibility at a cost – Should governments stimulate tertiary education for adults?," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 7(C), pages 69-86.
    9. Nobuyoshi Kikuchi, 2017. "Marginal Returns to Schooling and Education Policy Change in Japan," ISER Discussion Paper 0996, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    10. Oreopoulos, Philip & Petronijevic, Uros, 2019. "The Remarkable Unresponsiveness of College Students to Nudging and What We Can Learn from It," IZA Discussion Papers 12460, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Oriana Bandiera & Niklas Buehren & Robin Burgess & Markus Goldstein & Selim Gulesci & Imran Rasul & Munshi Sulaiman, 2020. "Women's Empowerment in Action: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial in Africa," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 210-259, January.
    12. Thomas Cornelissen & Christian Dustmann & Anna Christina Raute & Uta Schönberg, 2016. "From Late to MTE: Alternative Methods for the Evaluation of Policy Interventions," CESifo Working Paper Series 5987, CESifo.
    13. Anthony Lepinteur & Giorgia Menta, 2020. "Boys don't cry (or do the dishes): family size and the housework gender gap," CREA Discussion Paper Series 20-04, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    14. Daniel Kamhoefer & Matthias Westphal, 2017. "Fertility Effects of College Education: Evidence from the German Educational Expansion," CINCH Working Paper Series 1705, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Competent in Competition and Health.
    15. Anthony Lepinteur & Giorgia Menta, 2020. "Boys don't cry (or do the dishes): family size and the housework gender gap," CREA Discussion Paper Series 20-04, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    16. Kamhöfer, Daniel A. & Westphal, Matthias, 2019. "Fertility effects of college education: Evidence from the German educational expansion," DICE Discussion Papers 316, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    17. Edin, Per-Anders & Fredriksson, Peter & Nybom, Martin & Öckert, Björn, 2017. "The Rising Return to Non-Cognitive Skill," IZA Discussion Papers 10914, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    18. Kamhöfer, Daniel & Westphal, Matthias, 2018. "Fertility Effects of College Education: Evidence from the German Educational Expansion," Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181624, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    19. Mohitosh Kejriwal & Xiaoxiao Li & Evan Totty, 2019. "Multidemsional Skills and Returns to Schooling: Evidence from an Interactive Fixed Effects Aproach and a Linked Survey-Administrative Dataset," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1316, Purdue University, Department of Economics.
    20. Mohitosh Kejriwal & Xiaoxiao Li & Evan Totty, 2018. "Multidimensional Skills and the Returns to Schooling: Evidence from an Interactive Fixed Effects Approach and a Linked Survey-Administrative Dataset," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1309, Purdue University, Department of Economics.
    21. Paul Gregg & Lindsey Macmillan & Claudia Vittori, 2019. "Intergenerational income mobility: access to top jobs, the low-pay no-pay cycle and the role of education in a common framework," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 32(2), pages 501-528, April.
    22. repec:iab:iabdpa:201919 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. Nobuyoshi Kikuchi, 2017. "Marginal Returns to Schooling and Education Policy Change in Japan," ISER Discussion Paper 0996r, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University, revised Oct 2017.

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