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Women's College Decisions: How Much Does Marriage Matter?

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  • Suqin Ge

Abstract

This article investigates the sequential college attendance decision of young women and quantifies the effect of marriage expectations on their decision to attend and graduate from college. A dynamic choice model of college attendance, labor supply, and marriage is formulated and structurally estimated using panel data from the NLSY79. The model is used to simulate the effects of no marriage benefits and finds that the predicted college enrollment rate will drop from 58.0% to 50.5%. Using the estimated model, the college attendance behavior for a younger cohort from the NLSY97 is predicted and used to validate the behavioral model.

Suggested Citation

  • Suqin Ge, 2011. "Women's College Decisions: How Much Does Marriage Matter?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(4), pages 773-818.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/660774
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    Cited by:

    1. Alena Bicakova & Stepan Jurajda, 2014. "The Quiet Revolution and the Family: Gender Composition of Tertiary Education and Early Fertility Patterns," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp504, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    2. Linda N. Edwards & Takuya Hasebe & Tadashi Sakai, 2015. "Education and Marriage Decisions of Japanese Women and the Role of the Equal Employment Opportunity Act," Working Papers 7, City University of New York Graduate Center, Ph.D. Program in Economics.
    3. Suqin Ge & Fang Yang, 2013. "Accounting For The Gender Gap In College Attainment," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 51(1), pages 478-499, January.
    4. Courtioux, Pierre & Lignon, Vincent, 2016. "A good career or a good marriage: The returns of higher education in France," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 221-237.
    5. Dylan Conger & Lisa Dickson, 2017. "Gender Imbalance in Higher Education: Insights for College Administrators and Researchers," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 58(2), pages 214-230, March.
    6. Martha J. Bailey & Brad Hershbein & Amalia R. Miller, 2012. "The Opt-In Revolution? Contraception and the Gender Gap in Wages," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(3), pages 225-254, July.
    7. Bicakova, Alena & Jurajda, Stepan, 2016. "Field-of-Study Homogamy," CEPR Discussion Papers 11177, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Evren Ors & Frédéric Palomino & Eloïc Peyrache, 2013. "Performance Gender Gap: Does Competition Matter?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(3), pages 443-499.
    9. Matthew Wiswall & Basit Zafar, 2015. "Determinants of College Major Choice: Identification using an Information Experiment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(2), pages 791-824.
    10. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:2:p:1007-1016 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Ge, Suqin, 2013. "Estimating the returns to schooling: Implications from a dynamic discrete choice model," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 92-105.
    12. Xiaodong Fan & Hanming Fang & Simen Markussen, 2015. "Mothers' Employment and Children's Educational Gender Gap," NBER Working Papers 21183, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Seki, Mai, 2014. "Heterogeneous Returns to U.S. College Selectivity and the Value of Graduate Degree Attainment," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2014-53, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 25 Nov 2014.
    14. Matthew Wiswall & Basit Zafar, 2016. "Human Capital Investments and Expectations about Career and Family," NBER Working Papers 22543, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Raquel Fernández & Joyce C. Wong, 2014. "Divorce Risk, Wages, and Working Wives: A Quantitative Life-Cycle Analysis of Female Labor Force Participation," NBER Working Papers 19869, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Pierre Courtioux & Vincent Lignon, 2015. "Homogamie éducative et inégalités de revenu salarial : une perspective de cycle de vie," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 481(1), pages 149-183.
    17. Joyce Wong & Raquel Fernández, 2012. "The Disappearing Gender Gap: The impact of divorce, wages, and preferences on education and women's work," 2012 Meeting Papers 176, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    18. Enrica Di Stefano, 2017. "Leaving your mamma: why so late in Italy?," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1144, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    19. Lars Lefgren & Frank McIntyre, 2006. "The Relationship between Women's Education and Marriage Outcomes," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(4), pages 787-830, October.

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