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The Effects of Rural Electrification on Employment: New Evidence from South Africa

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  • Taryn Dinkelman

    (Princeton University)

Abstract

This paper estimates the impact of electrification on employment growth by analyzing South Africa's mass roll-out of electricity to rural households. Using several new data sources and two different identification strategies (an instrumental variables strategy and a fixed effects approach), nd that electrification significantly raises female employment within 5 years. This new infras- tructure appears to increase hours of work for men and women, while reducing female wages and increasing male earnings. Several pieces of evidence suggest that household electrification raises employment by releasing women from home production and enabling micro-enterprizes. Migration behavior may also be affected.

Suggested Citation

  • Taryn Dinkelman, 2010. "The Effects of Rural Electrification on Employment: New Evidence from South Africa," Working Papers 1255, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
  • Handle: RePEc:pri:rpdevs:dinkelman_electricity_0810.pdf
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    electrification; labor markets; women; electricity; employment; South Africa;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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