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The Impact of the Boll Weevil, 1892–1932

Author

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  • Lange, Fabian
  • Olmstead, Alan L.
  • Rhode, Paul W.

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Lange, Fabian & Olmstead, Alan L. & Rhode, Paul W., 2009. "The Impact of the Boll Weevil, 1892–1932," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(03), pages 685-718, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:69:y:2009:i:03:p:685-718_00
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ager, Philipp & Brückner, Markus & Herz, Benedikt, 2014. "Effects of Agricultural Productivity Shocks on Female Labor Supply: Evidence from the Boll Weevil Plague in the US South," MPRA Paper 59410, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Jonathan F. Fox & Price V. Fishback & Paul W. Rhode, 2011. "The Effects of Weather Shocks on Crop Prices in Unfettered Markets: The United States Prior to the Farm Programs, 1895-1932," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Climate Change: Adaptations Past and Present, pages 99-130 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Stephan E. Maurer & Andrei V. Potlogea, 2017. "Male-biased Demand Shocks and Women’s Labor Force Participation: Evidence from Large Oil Field Discoveries," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2017-08, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    4. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0581-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Dora L. Costa, 2008. "The Rise of Retirement Among African Americans: Wealth and Social Security Effects," NBER Working Papers 14462, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Philipp Ager, 2013. "The Persistence of de Facto Power: Elites and Economic Development in the US South, 1840-1960," Working Papers 0038, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    7. Karen Clay & Ethan Schmick & Werner Troesken, 2017. "The Rise and Fall of Pellagra in the American South," NBER Working Papers 23730, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. repec:eee:exehis:v:65:y:2017:i:c:p:94-105 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Alan L. Olmstead & Paul W. Rhode, 2011. "Responding to Climatic Challenges: Lessons from U.S. Agricultural Development," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Climate Change: Adaptations Past and Present, pages 169-194 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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