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Local Labor Market Impacts of Energy Boom-Bust-Boom in Western Canada

The direct and indirect impacts of energy sector boom and bust upon local labor markets are analyzed through the differential growth in employment and earnings between areas with and without energy resources. The estimated differentials attributed to each of these labor demand shocks show that the direct impacts upon the energy sector are large while the indirect impacts upon non-energy sectors are smaller. The significant results of the local job multipliers indicate that job creation in energy extraction also creates new jobs in local sectors during boom periods while displaying no significant job loss spillovers during a bust.

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File URL: http://www.uofaweb.ualberta.ca/economics2/pdfs/WP2010-17-Marchand.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Alberta, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2010-17.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: 01 Nov 2010
Date of revision: 01 Mar 2011
Handle: RePEc:ris:albaec:2010_017
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  1. Topel, Robert H, 1986. "Local Labor Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(3), pages S111-43, June.
  2. Dan Black & Terra McKinnish & Seth Sanders, 2005. "The Economic Impact Of The Coal Boom And Bust," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(503), pages 449-476, 04.
  3. Carrington, William J, 1996. "The Alaskan Labor Market during the Pipeline Era," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(1), pages 186-218, February.
  4. Belasen, Ariel R. & Polachek, Solomon, 2007. "How Disasters Affect Local Labor Markets: The Effects of Hurricanes in Florida," IZA Discussion Papers 2976, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Hanson, Andrew, 2009. "Local employment, poverty, and property value effects of geographically-targeted tax incentives: An instrumental variables approach," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 721-731, November.
  6. Matias Busso & Patrick Kline, 2008. "Do Local Economic Development Programs Work? Evidence from the Federal Empowerment Zone Program," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1639, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  7. Ariel R. Belasen & Solomon W. Polachek, 2008. "How Hurricanes Affect Wages and Employment in Local Labor Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 49-53, May.
  8. David Neumark & Jed Kolko, 2008. "Do Enterprise Zones Create Jobs? Evidence from California's Enterprise Zone Program," NBER Working Papers 14530, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Enrico Moretti, 2010. "Local Multipliers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 373-77, May.
  10. Moretti, Enrico, 2004. "Bidding for Industrial Plants: Does Winning a 'Million Dollar Plant' Increase Welfare?," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt5cz0h23t, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  11. Jed Kolko & David Neumark, 2009. "Do Some Enterprise Zones Create Jobs?," NBER Working Papers 15206, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Olivier Jean Blanchard & Lawrence F. Katz, 1992. "Regional Evolutions," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 23(1), pages 1-76.
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  1. Labor Economics (ECON 431)

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