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The gendered labor market impacts of trade liberalization : evidence from Brazil

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  • Gaddis, Isis
  • Pieters, Janneke

Abstract

This paper investigates gender differences in the impact of Brazil's trade liberalization on labor market outcomes. To identify the causal effect of trade reforms, the paper uses difference-in-difference estimation exploiting variation across microregions in pre-liberalization industry composition. The analysis finds that trade liberalization reduced male and female labor force participation and employment rates, but the effects on men were significantly larger. Thereby, tariff reductions contributed to gender convergence in labor force participation and employment rates. Gender differences are concentrated among the low-skilled population and in the tradable sector, where male and female workers are most likely to be imperfect substitutes.

Suggested Citation

  • Gaddis, Isis & Pieters, Janneke, 2014. "The gendered labor market impacts of trade liberalization : evidence from Brazil," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7095, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7095
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kis-Katos, Krisztina & Sparrow, Robert, 2015. "Poverty, labor markets and trade liberalization in Indonesia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 94-106.
    2. repec:tpr:asiaec:v:17:y:2018:i:2:p:25-46 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Rachel Heath & Seema Jayachandran, 2016. "The Causes and Consequences of Increased Female Education and Labor Force Participation in Developing Countries," Working Papers id:11434, eSocialSciences.
    4. Stephan E. Maurer & Andrei V. Potlogea, 2017. "Male-biased Demand Shocks and Women’s Labor Force Participation: Evidence from Large Oil Field Discoveries," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2017-08, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    5. Shushanik Hakobyan & John McLaren, 2017. "NAFTA and the Gender Wage Gap," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 17-270, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    6. repec:bla:rdevec:v:21:y:2017:i:4:p:1018-1056 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Kozo Kiyota & Sawako Maruyama, 2018. "On the Demand for Female Workers in Japan: The Role of ICT and Offshoring," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 17(2), pages 25-46, Summer.
    8. Ghani,Syed Ejaz & Grover,Arti & Kerr,Sari & Kerr,William Robert, 2016. "Will market competition trump gender discrimination in India ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7814, The World Bank.
    9. Janneke Pieters, 2015. "Trade liberalization and gender inequality," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 114-114, January.
    10. Kis-Katos, Krisztina & Pieters, Janneke & Sparrow, Robert, 2017. "Globalization and Social Change: Gender-Specific Effects of Trade Liberalization in Indonesia," IZA Discussion Papers 10552, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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    Keywords

    Labor Markets; Labor Policies; Free Trade; Gender and Development; Trade Policy;

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