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Poverty, Labour Markets and Trade Liberalization in Indonesia

Author

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  • Kis-Katos, Krisztina

    () (University of Goettingen)

  • Sparrow, Robert

    () (Wageningen University)

Abstract

We measure the effects of trade liberalization over the period of 1993-2002 on regional poverty levels in 259 Indonesian regions, and investigate the labour market mechanisms behind these effects. The identification strategy relies on combining information on initial regional labour and product market structure with the exogenous tariff reduction schedule over four three-year periods. We find that poverty reduced more in regions that were more strongly exposed to import tariff liberalization. Among the potential channels behind this effect, we highlight the formalization of the unskilled labour force and structural reallocation of labour. We also show that job formation and increases in unskilled wages were related to reductions in import tariffs on intermediate goods and not to reductions in import tariffs on final outputs. These results point towards increasing firm competitiveness as a driving factor behind the beneficial poverty effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Kis-Katos, Krisztina & Sparrow, Robert, 2013. "Poverty, Labour Markets and Trade Liberalization in Indonesia," IZA Discussion Papers 7645, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7645
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Embrey & Guillaume R. Frechette & Sevgi Yuksel, 2016. "Cooperation in the Finitely Repeated Prisoner's Dilemma," Working Paper Series 8616, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    2. Kis-Katos, Krisztina & Pieters, Janneke & Sparrow, Robert, 2017. "Globalization and Social Change: Gender-Specific Effects of Trade Liberalization in Indonesia," IZA Discussion Papers 10552, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Mahadevan, Renuka & Nugroho, Anda & Amir, Hidayat, 2017. "Do inward looking trade policies affect poverty and income inequality? Evidence from Indonesia's recent wave of rising protectionism," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 23-34.
    4. repec:lpe:efijnl:201603 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:uwp:jhriss:v:52:y:2017:i:2:p:457-490 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Isis Gaddis & Janneke Pieters, 2017. "The Gendered Labor Market Impacts of Trade Liberalization: Evidence from Brazil," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 52(2), pages 457-490.
    7. Nihar Shembavnekar, 2015. "Tariff Liberalisation, Labour Market Flexibility and Employment: Evidence from India," Working Paper Series 8115, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    8. Rus’an Nasrudin, 2016. "The Impact of Lagging-Region Status on District Poverty in Indonesia," Economics and Finance in Indonesia, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Indonesia, vol. 62, pages 30-43, April.
    9. repec:sos:sosjrn:180108 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    trade liberalization; labour markets; poverty; Indonesia;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O24 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Trade Policy; Factor Movement; Foreign Exchange Policy
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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