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Globalization, Regional Wage Differentials and the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem: Evidence from México

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  • Daniel Chiquiar

Abstract

Using individual-level data on personal characteristics and wages and state-level data on trade, foreign direct investment, international migration and other site-specific features, I study what factors determined the changes in Mexico's regional wage differentials between 1990 and 2000. I exploit the regional variation in the exposure to globalization to identify the effects of NAFTA on wages and on returns to schooling. The results support the presence of Stolper-Samuelson type of responses during Mexico's globalization process: regions more exposed to international markets appear to have exhibited an increase in wage levels, but a decrease in returns to schooling, relative to other regions of the country. The results suggest that globalization has an important spatial dimension that is usually neglected in traditional trade models.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Chiquiar, 2004. "Globalization, Regional Wage Differentials and the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem: Evidence from México," Working Papers 2004-06, Banco de México.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdm:wpaper:2004-06
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Trade Liberalization; Stolper-Samuelson Theorem; Wage Differentials; NAFTA; Economic Geography;

    JEL classification:

    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions

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