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Labor market consequences of trade openness and competition in foreign markets

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  • Chiquiar Daniel, Covarrubias Enrique, Salcedo Alejandrina

Abstract

We analyze the labor market consequences of international trade, using the evidence provided by the behavior of Mexican labor markets after the introduction of NAFTA in the nineties and the accession of China to the WTO in 2001. Following an approach close to that proposed by Autor, Dorn and Hanson (2013), we use the local market variation on exposure to international markets to identify the effects of these events. We show that NAFTA integration reduced unemployment, and boosted employment and wages. Chinese competition tended to have the opposite effect. Additionally, we find that the labor market responses to international trade are heterogeneous across regions in the country, being significantly stronger in the regions closer to the U.S. border.

Suggested Citation

  • Chiquiar Daniel, Covarrubias Enrique, Salcedo Alejandrina, 2017. "Labor market consequences of trade openness and competition in foreign markets," Working Papers 2017-01, Banco de México.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdm:wpaper:2017-01
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    12. Chiquiar, Daniel, 2005. "Why Mexico's regional income convergence broke down," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 257-275, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cristina Fernández & Leonardo Villar & Nicolás Gómez, 2017. "Taxonomía de la informalidad en América Latina," Coyuntura Económica, Fedesarrollo, vol. 47(1 y 2), pages 137-167, December.
    2. Puigvert Jonathan & Juárez-Torres Miriam, 2019. "Labour Force Participation and the Business Cycle in Mexico," Working Papers 2019-04, Banco de México.
    3. Giuntella, Osea & Rieger, Matthias & Rotunno, Lorenzo, 2020. "Weight gains from trade in foods: Evidence from Mexico," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
    4. Raphael Auer & Barthélémy Bonadio & Andrei A Levchenko, 2018. "The economics of revoking NAFTA," BIS Working Papers 739, Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Raymond Robertson & Timothy J. Halliday & Sindhu Vasireddy, 2020. "Labour market adjustment to third‐party competition: Evidence from Mexico," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(7), pages 1977-2006, July.
    6. Melissa Dell & Benjamin Feigenberg & Kensuke Teshima, 2019. "The Violent Consequences of Trade-Induced Worker Displacement in Mexico," American Economic Review: Insights, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 43-58, June.
    7. Gómez-Zaldívar, Manuel & Mosqueda, Marco T. & Duran, Jazmin A., 2017. "Localization of manufacturing industries and specialization in Mexican states: 1993–2013," MPRA Paper 76510, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Hernández Vega Marco A., 2018. "Does Monetary Policy in Advanced Economies Have Differentiated Effects on Portfolio Flows to Emerging Economies?," Working Papers 2018-26, Banco de México.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International trade and labor markets; local labor markets; Mexico; NAFTA; Chinese competition;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions

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