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Offshoring in the Global Economy: Microeconomic Structure and Macroeconomic Implications

Author

Listed:
  • Robert C. Feenstra

    () (University of California, Davis)

Abstract

In the early 1990s, trade and labor economists, noting the fall in wages for low-skilled workers relative to high-skilled workers, began to debate the impact of trade on wages. This debate—which led to a sometimes heated exchange on the role of trade versus the role of technological change in explaining wage movements—continues today, with the focus now shifting to workers in the middle of the wage distribution. In Offshoring in the Global Economy, noted economist Robert Feenstra offers a synthesis of fifteen years of research—linking his own work to related research by others—on the globalization of production and its relation to wage movements. Feenstra first contrasts the views of trade economists Paul Krugman and Edward Leamer, who both relied (to different ends) on the Heckscher–Ohlin model. He then examines the new type of trade model whereby the production processes transfer across countries. Feenstra suggests a new calculation of the factor content of trade that demonstrates the durability of the Heckscher–Ohlin model. Feenstra examines as well the impacts of business cycle volatility, prices, and productivity on the macroeconomics of offshoring. In a concluding chapter, he addresses the broader implications of both empirical and theoretical work on offshoring and suggests directions for future research. Ohlin Lectures series

Suggested Citation

  • Robert C. Feenstra, 2010. "Offshoring in the Global Economy: Microeconomic Structure and Macroeconomic Implications," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262013835, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:mtp:titles:0262013835
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    trade; technological change; wages; globalization; production; Paul Krugman; Edward Leamer; Heckscher-Olin model; offshoring;

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs

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