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Are Your Wages Set in Beijing?

Author

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  • Richard B. Freeman

Abstract

The economic troubles of less-skilled workers in the United States. and OECD-Europe during a period of rising manufacturing imports from third world countries has created a debate about whether, in a global economy, wages or employment are determined by the global rather than domestic labor-market conditions. One side argues that trade is all that matters; another side, that trade does not matter at all. The author rejects these polar views; empirical analysis has found modest but real trade effects in displacement of less-skilled labor and declines in the price of goods produced by low-skilled workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard B. Freeman, 1995. "Are Your Wages Set in Beijing?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 15-32, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:9:y:1995:i:3:p:15-32
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.9.3.15
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.9.3.15
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. J. Peter Neary & Albert G. Schweinberger, 1986. "Factor Content Functions and the Theory of International Trade," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 421-432.
    2. Feldstein, Martin & Horioka, Charles, 1980. "Domestic Saving and International Capital Flows," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 90(358), pages 314-329, June.
    3. Alan V. Deardorff & Robert W. STAIGER, 2011. "An Interpretation Of The Factor Content Of Trade," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Robert M Stern (ed.), Comparative Advantage, Growth, And The Gains From Trade And Globalization A Festschrift in Honor of Alan V Deardorff, chapter 38, pages 531-545, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    4. Norman, Victor D & Venables, Anthony J, 1995. "International Trade, Factor Mobility and Trade Costs," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(433), pages 1488-1504, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

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