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The impact of trade liberalizationon wage inequality:Evidence from Argentina

Wage inequality in Argentina greatly increased during the nineties. During this period, a rapid and deep process of trade liberalization was implemented. In this paper we study whether trade liberalization played any role in shaping the Argentine wage structure during the nineties. Specifically, we test whether those sectors where import penetration deepened are also the sectors where, ceteris paribus, a higher increase in wage inequality is observed. Even though we find some evidence that supports this hypothesis, as has been found for some developed economies, trade deepening can only explain a relatively small proportion of the observed rise in wage inequality.

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File URL: http://www.utdt.edu/download.php?fname=_116465333320307700.pdf
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Paper provided by Universidad Torcuato Di Tella in its series Department of Economics Working Papers with number 011.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:udt:wpecon:011
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.utdt.edu/ver_contenido.php?id_contenido=439&id_item_menu=568

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  1. Galiani, Sebastian & Hopenhayn, Hugo A., 2003. "Duration and risk of unemployment in Argentina," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 199-212, June.
  2. Adrian Wood, 1995. "How Trade Hurt Unskilled Workers," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 57-80, Summer.
  3. Bound, John & Johnson, George, 1992. "Changes in the Structure of Wages in the 1980's: An Evaluation of Alternative Explanations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 371-92, June.
  4. Wood Júnior, Thomaz, 1995. "Workers," RAE - Revista de Administração de Empresas, FGV-EAESP Escola de Administração de Empresas de São Paulo (Brazil), vol. 35(2), January.
  5. Robert C. Feenstra, . "Integration Of Trade And Disintegration Of Production In The Global Economy," Department of Economics 98-06, California Davis - Department of Economics.
  6. Stephen Machin, 1995. "Changes in the Relative Demand for Skills in the UK Labour Market," CEP Discussion Papers dp0221, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  7. Moulton, Brent R., 1986. "Random group effects and the precision of regression estimates," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 385-397, August.
  8. Mary E. Lovely & J. David Richardson, 2000. "Trade Flows and Wage Premiums: Does Who or What Matter?," NBER Chapters, in: The Impact of International Trade on Wages, pages 309-348 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Edward E. Leamer, 1994. "Trade, Wages and Revolving Door Ideas," NBER Working Papers 4716, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Machin, Stephen, 1996. "Wage Inequality in the UK," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 47-64, Spring.
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