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Brain versus Brawn: The Realization of Women's Comparative Advantage

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  • Michelle Rendall

    (University of Zurich)

Abstract

While the empirical results are specific to the United States, the model developed could also be used to study cross-country differences in women's labor market participation. Rogerson (2005) notes that the change in relative employment of women and the aggregate service share (a brain-intensive sector given data evidence) between 1985 and 2000 are highly correlated at 0.82, concluding that countries which added the most jobs to the service sector also closed the employment gap the most.

Suggested Citation

  • Michelle Rendall, 2010. "Brain versus Brawn: The Realization of Women's Comparative Advantage," 2010 Meeting Papers 926, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:926
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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