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Do Minimum Wage Increases Influence Worker Health?

Listed author(s):
  • Horn, Brady P.

    ()

    (University of New Mexico)

  • Maclean, J. Catherine

    ()

    (Temple University)

  • Strain, Michael R.

    ()

    (American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research)

This study investigates whether minimum wage increases in the United States affect an important non-market outcome: worker health. To study this question, we use data on lesser-skilled workers from the 1993-2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Surveys coupled with differences-in-differences and triple-difference models. We find little evidence that minimum wage increases lead to improvements in overall worker health. In fact, we find some evidence that minimum wage increases may decrease some aspects of health, especially among unemployed male workers. We also find evidence that increases reduce mental strain among employed workers.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 10479.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2017
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10479
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