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Michael R. Strain

Personal Details

First Name:Michael
Middle Name:R.
Last Name:Strain
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pst593
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/mrstrain/
Twitter: @michaelrstrain

Affiliation

(95%) American Enterprise Institute

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.aei.org/

: (202) 862-5800
(202) 862-7178
1150 Seventeenth Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036
RePEc:edi:aeiiius (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) Institute of Labor Economics (IZA)

Bonn, Germany
http://www.iza.org/

:

P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn
RePEc:edi:izaaade (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Books

Working papers

  1. Clemens, Jeffrey & Strain, Michael R., 2018. "Minimum Wage Analysis Using a Pre-Committed Research Design: Evidence through 2016," IZA Discussion Papers 11427, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Michael R. Strain & Jeffrey Clemens, 2017. "Estimating the employment effects of recent minimum wage changes: Early evidence, an interpretative framework, and a pre-commitment to future analysis," AEI Economics Working Papers 914893, American Enterprise Institute.
  3. Michael R. Strain & Brady P. Horn & Johanna Catherine Maclean, 2016. "Do minimum wage increases influence worker health?," AEI Economics Working Papers 870484, American Enterprise Institute.
  4. Michael R. Strain & Peter Brummund, 2016. "Real and permanent minimum wages," AEI Economics Working Papers 875967, American Enterprise Institute.
  5. Strain, Michael R. & Webber, Douglas A., 2015. "High School Experiences, the Gender Wage Gap, and the Selection of Occupation," IZA Discussion Papers 9277, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Michael R. Strain, 2013. "Do volatile firms pay volatile earnings? Evidence using linked worker-firm data," AEI Economics Working Papers 10338, American Enterprise Institute.
  7. Donald P. Morgan & Michael R. Strain, 2008. "How household fare after payday credit banks," Proceedings 1083, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  8. Donald P. Morgan & Michael R. Strain, 2007. "Payday holiday: how households fare after payday credit bans," Staff Reports 309, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Articles

  1. Michael R. Strain & Douglas A. Webber, 2017. "High school experiences, the gender wage gap, and the selection of occupation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(49), pages 5040-5049, October.
  2. Michael R. Strain, 2017. "Do volatile firms pay volatile earnings? Evidence from linked worker-firm data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(43), pages 4299-4309, September.
  3. Brady P. Horn & Johanna Catherine Maclean & Michael R. Strain, 2017. "Do Minimum Wage Increases Influence Worker Health?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(4), pages 1986-2007, October.
  4. Aparna Mathur & Sita Nataraj Slavov & Michael R. Strain, 2016. "Has the Affordable Care Act increased part-time employment?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 222-225, February.
  5. Aparna Mathur & Nirupama S. Rao & Michael R. Strain & Stan A. Veuger, 2016. "Dividends and Investment," Public Finance Review, , vol. 44(6), pages 769-787, November.
  6. Strain, Michael R., 2013. "Single-sex classes & student outcomes: Evidence from North Carolina," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 73-87.
  7. Donald P. Morgan & Michael R. Strain & Ihab Seblani, 2012. "How Payday Credit Access Affects Overdrafts and Other Outcomes," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 44, pages 519-531, March.

Books

  1. Michael R. Strain, 2016. "The US Labor Market: Questions and Challenges for Public Policy," Books, American Enterprise Institute, number 903666.
  2. Stan Veuger & Michael R. Strain, 2016. "Economic Freedom and Human Flourishing: Perspectives from Political Philosophy," Books, American Enterprise Institute, number 899213.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Michael R. Strain & Jeffrey Clemens, 2017. "Estimating the employment effects of recent minimum wage changes: Early evidence, an interpretative framework, and a pre-commitment to future analysis," AEI Economics Working Papers 914893, American Enterprise Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Ekaterina Jardim & Mark C. Long & Robert Plotnick & Emma van Inwegen & Jacob Vigdor & Hilary Wething, 2017. "Minimum Wage Increases, Wages, and Low-Wage Employment: Evidence from Seattle," NBER Working Papers 23532, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Clemens, Jeffrey, 2017. "The Minimum Wage and the Great Recession: A Response to Zipperer and Recapitulation of the Evidence," MPRA Paper 80153, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  2. Michael R. Strain & Brady P. Horn & Johanna Catherine Maclean, 2016. "Do minimum wage increases influence worker health?," AEI Economics Working Papers 870484, American Enterprise Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Hersch Nicholas, Lauren & Maclean, J. Catherine, 2017. "The Effect of Medical Marijuana Laws on the Labor Supply of Older Adults: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study," IZA Discussion Papers 10489, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Lauren Hersch Nicholas & Johanna Catherine Maclean, 2016. "The effect of medical marijuana laws on the health and labor supply of older adults: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study," NBER Working Papers 22688, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Averett, Susan L. & Smith, Julie K. & Wang, Yang, 2016. "The Effects of Minimum Wages on the Health of Working Teenagers," IZA Discussion Papers 10185, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. George Wehby & Dhaval Dave & Robert Kaestner, 2016. "Effects of the Minimum Wage on Infant Health," NBER Working Papers 22373, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Popovici, Ioana & Maclean, J. Catherine & French, Michael, 2017. "The Effects of Health Insurance Parity Laws for Substance Use Disorder Treatment on Traffic Fatalities: Evidence of Unintended Benefits," IZA Discussion Papers 10746, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Susan L. Averett & Julie K. Smith & Yang Wang, 2017. "The effects of minimum wages on the health of working teenagers," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(16), pages 1127-1130, September.
    7. Ioana Popovici & Johanna Catherine Maclean & Michael T. French, 2017. "Health Insurance and Traffic Fatalities: The Effects of Substance Use Disorder Parity Laws," NBER Working Papers 23388, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Michael R. Strain & Peter Brummund, 2016. "Real and permanent minimum wages," AEI Economics Working Papers 875967, American Enterprise Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael R. Strain & Jeffrey Clemens, 2017. "Estimating the employment effects of recent minimum wage changes: Early evidence, an interpretative framework, and a pre-commitment to future analysis," AEI Economics Working Papers 914893, American Enterprise Institute.
    2. Clemens, Jeffrey, 2017. "The Minimum Wage and the Great Recession: A Response to Zipperer and Recapitulation of the Evidence," MPRA Paper 80153, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  4. Michael R. Strain, 2013. "Do volatile firms pay volatile earnings? Evidence using linked worker-firm data," AEI Economics Working Papers 10338, American Enterprise Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Paula Garda & Volker Ziemann, 2014. "Economic Policies and Microeconomic Stability: A Literature Review and Some Empirics," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1115, OECD Publishing.
    2. Chinhui Juhn & Kristin McCue & Holly Monti & Brooks Pierce, 2015. "Firm Performance and the Volatility of Worker Earnings," NBER Chapters,in: Firms and the Distribution of Income: The Roles of Productivity and Luck National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  5. Donald P. Morgan & Michael R. Strain, 2008. "How household fare after payday credit banks," Proceedings 1083, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

    Cited by:

    1. Fedaseyeu, Viktar, 2015. "Debt collection agencies and the supply of consumer credit," Working Papers 15-23, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

  6. Donald P. Morgan & Michael R. Strain, 2007. "Payday holiday: how households fare after payday credit bans," Staff Reports 309, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

    Cited by:

    1. Campbell, Dennis & Asís Martínez-Jerez, F. & Tufano, Peter, 2012. "Bouncing out of the banking system: An empirical analysis of involuntary bank account closures," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 1224-1235.
    2. Campbell, John Y. & Tufano, Peter & Madrian, Brigitte C. & Jackson, Howell Edmunds, 2011. "Consumer Financial Protection," Scholarly Articles 9887620, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    3. Brian T. Melzer, 2013. "Spillovers From Costly Credit," Working Papers 13-11, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    4. Fedaseyeu, Viktar, 2015. "Debt collection agencies and the supply of consumer credit," Working Papers 15-23, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    5. Robert DeYoung & Ronnie J. Phillips, 2013. "Interest rate caps and implicit collusion: the case of payday lending," International Journal of Banking, Accounting and Finance, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(1/2), pages 121-158.
    6. Renuka Sane & Susan Thomas, 2013. "The real cost of credit constraints: Evidence from micro-finance," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2013-013, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    7. McKernan, Signe-Mary & Ratcliffe, Caroline & Kuehn, Daniel, 2013. "Prohibitions, price caps, and disclosures: A look at state policies and alternative financial product use," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 207-223.
    8. Marianne Bertrand & Adair Morse, 2009. "Information Disclosure, Cognitive Biases and Payday Borrowing," Working Papers 2009-007, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    9. Alex Kaufman, 2013. "Payday lending regulation," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-62, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    10. Dean Karlan & Jonathan Zinman, 2007. "Expanding Credit Access: Using Randomized Supply Decisions to Estimate the Impacts," Working Papers 956, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    11. Wilson Bart J & Findlay David W. & Meehan James W. & Wellford Charissa & Schurter Karl, 2010. "An Experimental Analysis of the Demand for Payday Loans," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-31, October.
    12. Brian T. Melzer & Donald P. Morgan, 2009. "Price-increasing competition: the curious case of overdraft versus deferred deposit credit," Staff Reports 391, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    13. Zinman, Jonathan, 2010. "Restricting consumer credit access: Household survey evidence on effects around the Oregon rate cap," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 546-556, March.
    14. Campbell, John Y. & Jackson, Howell E. & Madrian, Brigitte C. & Tufano, Peter, 2010. "The Regulation of Consumer Financial Products: An Introductory Essay with Four Case Studies," Working Paper Series rwp10-040, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    15. Scott Carrell & Jonathan Zinman, 2014. "In Harm's Way? Payday Loan Access and Military Personnel Performance," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(9), pages 2805-2840.
    16. Anping Chen & Marlon Boarnet & Mark Partridge & Christopher S. Fowler & Jane K. Cover & Rachel Garshick Kleit, 2014. "The Geography Of Fringe Banking," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(4), pages 688-710, September.
    17. Marc Fusaro & Richard Ericson, 2010. "The Welfare Economics of “Bounce Protection” Programs," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 55-73, March.
    18. James Barth & Jitka Hilliard & John Jahera, 2015. "Banks and Payday Lenders: Friends or Foes?," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 21(2), pages 139-153, May.

Articles

  1. Brady P. Horn & Johanna Catherine Maclean & Michael R. Strain, 2017. "Do Minimum Wage Increases Influence Worker Health?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(4), pages 1986-2007, October.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Aparna Mathur & Sita Nataraj Slavov & Michael R. Strain, 2016. "Has the Affordable Care Act increased part-time employment?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 222-225, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Marcus Dillender & Carolyn Heinrich & Susan Houseman, 2016. "Effects of the Affordable Care Act on Part-Time Employment: Early Evidence," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 16-258, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

  3. Strain, Michael R., 2013. "Single-sex classes & student outcomes: Evidence from North Carolina," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 73-87.

    Cited by:

    1. Figlio, David & Karbownik, Krzysztof & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2015. "Education Research and Administrative Data," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 24/2015, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    2. Soohyung Lee & Lesley J. Turner & Seokjin Woo & Kyunghee Kim, 2014. "All or Nothing? The Impact of School and Classroom Gender Composition on Effort and Academic Achievement," NBER Working Papers 20722, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  4. Donald P. Morgan & Michael R. Strain & Ihab Seblani, 2012. "How Payday Credit Access Affects Overdrafts and Other Outcomes," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 44, pages 519-531, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Mary Zaki, 2016. "Access to Short-term Credit and Consumption Smoothing within the Paycycle," Working Papers 2016.07, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    2. Adams, Robert M., 2017. "Bank Fees, Aftermarkets, and Consumer Behavior," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-054, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Hayashi, Fumiko & Cuddy, Emily, 2014. "Recurrent overdrafts: a deliberate decision by some prepaid cardholders?," Research Working Paper RWP 14-8, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    4. Nancy W. Hudspeth & David F. Merriman & Richard F. Dye & Andrew W. Crosby, 2015. "Do Troubled Times Invite Cloudy Budget Reporting? The Determinants of General Fund Expenditure Share in U.S. States," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(4), pages 68-89, December.
    5. Sumit Agarwal & Gene Amromin & Itzhak Ben-David & Douglas D. Evanoff, 2016. "Loan Product Steering in Mortgage Markets," NBER Working Papers 22696, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Taylor Canann & Richard Evans, 2015. "Determinants of Short-term Lender Location and Interest Rates," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 48(3), pages 235-262, December.
    7. Christine L. Dobridge, 2016. "For Better and for Worse? Effects of Access to High-Cost Consumer Credit," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-056, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    8. Agarwal, Sumit & Gross, Tal & Mazumder, Bhashkar, 2016. "How Did the Great Recession Affect Payday Loans?," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue 2, pages 1-12.
    9. Cuffe, Harold E & Gibbs, Christopher G, 2015. "The effect of payday lending restrictions on liquor sales," Working Paper Series 4713, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    10. Terri Friedline & Nancy Kepple, 2017. "Does Community Access to Alternative Financial Services Relate to Individuals’ Use of These Services? Beyond Individual Explanations," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 51-79, March.
    11. Barth, James R. & Hilliard, Jitka & Jahera, John S. & Sun, Yanfei, 2016. "Do state regulations affect payday lender concentration?," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 14-29.
    12. Bhutta, Neil, 2014. "Payday loans and consumer financial health," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 230-242.
    13. Zaki, Mary, 2016. "Access to Short-term Credit and Consumption Smoothing within the Paycycle," ET: Economic Theory 232213, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    14. Desai, Chintal A. & Elliehausen, Gregory, 2017. "The effect of state bans of payday lending on consumer credit delinquencies," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 94-107.
    15. Andra Ghent, 2014. "Are Young Borrowers Bad Borrowers? Evidence from the Credit CARD Act of 2009," 2014 Meeting Papers 130, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    16. Neil Bhutta & Jacob Goldin & Tatiana Homonoff, 2016. "Consumer Borrowing after Payday Loan Bans," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(1), pages 225-259.
    17. Anping Chen & Marlon Boarnet & Mark Partridge & Christopher S. Fowler & Jane K. Cover & Rachel Garshick Kleit, 2014. "The Geography Of Fringe Banking," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(4), pages 688-710, September.
    18. Melzer, Brian T. & Morgan, Donald P., 2015. "Competition in a consumer loan market: Payday loans and overdraft credit," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 25-44.
    19. Murizah Osman Salleh & Aziz Jaafar & M. Shahid Ebrahim, 2012. "Can an interest-free credit facility be more efficient than a usurious payday loan?," Working Papers 12008, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).
    20. James Barth & Jitka Hilliard & John Jahera, 2015. "Banks and Payday Lenders: Friends or Foes?," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 21(2), pages 139-153, May.

Books

  1. Michael R. Strain, 2016. "The US Labor Market: Questions and Challenges for Public Policy," Books, American Enterprise Institute, number 903666.

    Cited by:

    1. Miles Corak, 2017. "Divided Landscapes of Economic Opportunity: The Canadian Geography of Intergenerational Income Mobility," Working Papers 2017-043, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    2. World Bank, 2018. "Fair Progress?," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 28428.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (2) 2016-09-04 2017-02-05
  2. NEP-BAN: Banking (1) 2007-12-01
  3. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2015-08-30
  4. NEP-GER: German Papers (1) 2015-08-30
  5. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2017-02-05
  6. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2007-12-01

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