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The Contribution of Economists to Understanding Racial Health Disparities in the US

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  • Linda Dynan

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Abstract

Much research on the issue of health disparities in the United States has been produced by health services researchers across disciplines, particularly medical care providers, public health workers and sociologists. Many economists have also studied health disparities. This special issue of Atlantic Economic Journal highlights in particular the role of economic scholarship in this important national debate. This article, introducing the special issue, categorizes the contribution of many economists to the literature on health disparity. The literature reviewed ultimately includes 107 articles published between 1998 and 2008. Articles by any of the 932 economists that were members of the American Society of Health Economists in 2006 publishing about racial/ethnic health disparities as found in Medline, articles related to racial/ethnic health disparities published in Health Economics or the Journal of Health Economics or through searches in EconLit were reviewed for inclusion. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 2009

Suggested Citation

  • Linda Dynan, 2009. "The Contribution of Economists to Understanding Racial Health Disparities in the US," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 37(3), pages 213-223, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:37:y:2009:i:3:p:213-223 DOI: 10.1007/s11293-009-9180-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Rodney J. Andrews & Trevon D. Logan, 2010. "Family Health, Children's Own Health, and Test Score Gaps," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 195-199, May.
    2. Souleymane Soumahoro, 2017. "Ethnic Politics and Ebola Response in West Africa - Working Paper 453," Working Papers 453, Center for Global Development.

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