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Mental Well-being of the Bereaved and Labor Market Outcomes

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  • Atsuko Tanaka

    (University of Calgary)

  • Laurel Beck

Abstract

This paper examines how grief caused by the death of an immediate family member affects labor force outcomes through adverse changes to mental health for elderly Americans. To deal with measurement issues, we differentiate mental health conditions from personality by exploiting a panel data. We also apply factor analysis to create a synthetic indicator for mental well-being. We find that, whichever mental well-being measure is used, bereavement of a family causes poor mental health conditions to a significant extent, and associated distraction following bereavement have adverse impacts on labor market outcomes for elderly Americans.

Suggested Citation

  • Atsuko Tanaka & Laurel Beck, "undated". "Mental Well-being of the Bereaved and Labor Market Outcomes," Working Papers 2015-24, Department of Economics, University of Calgary, revised 19 Nov 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:clg:wpaper:2015-24
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    File URL: https://econ.ucalgary.ca/sites/econ.ucalgary.ca.manageprofile/files/unitis/publications/1-6640300/atanaka_lbeck_american.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Cseh Attila, 2008. "Labor Market Consequences of State Mental Health Parity Mandates," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(2), pages 1-34, April.
    6. Pinka Chatterji & Margarita Alegría & Mingshan Lu & David Takeuchi, 2007. "Psychiatric disorders and labor market outcomes: evidence from the National Latino and Asian American Study," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(10), pages 1069-1090.
    7. Vivian H. Hamilton & Philip Merrigan & Éric Dufresne, 1997. "Down and out: estimating the relationship between mental health and unemployment," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(4), pages 397-406.
    8. Lyndall Strazdins & Amy L Griffin & Dorothy H Broom & Cathy Banwell & Rosemary Korda & Jane Dixon & Francesco Paolucci & John Glover, 2011. "Time scarcity: another health inequality?," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 43(3), pages 545-559, March.
    9. Pinka Chatterji & Margarita Alegria & David Takeuchi, 2009. "Racial/Ethnic Differences in the Effects of Psychiatric Disorders on Employment," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 37(3), pages 243-257, September.
    10. Tefft, Nathan, 2011. "Insights on unemployment, unemployment insurance, and mental health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 258-264, March.
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