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Crime Victimisation and Subjective Well-Being: Panel Evidence from Australia

Author

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  • Mahuteau, Stephane

    () (University of Adelaide)

  • Zhu, Rong

    () (NILS, Flinders University)

Abstract

This paper estimates the effect of physical violence and property crimes on subjective well-being in Australia. Our methodology improves on previous contributions by (i) controlling for the endogeneity of victimisation and (ii) analysing the heterogeneous effect of victimisation along the whole distribution of well-being. Using fixed effects panel estimation, we find that both types of crimes reduce reported well-being to a large extent, with physical violence exerting a larger average effect than property crimes. Furthermore, using recently developed panel data quantile regression model with fixed effects, we show that the negative effects of both crimes are highly heterogeneous, with a monotonic decrease over the distribution of subjective well-being.

Suggested Citation

  • Mahuteau, Stephane & Zhu, Rong, 2015. "Crime Victimisation and Subjective Well-Being: Panel Evidence from Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 9253, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9253
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fang, Zheng & Niimi, Yoko, 2015. "Do Losses Bite More than Gains? Evidence from a Panel Quantile Regression Analysis of Subjective Well-being in Japan," MPRA Paper 68059, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. repec:spr:jhappi:v:19:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10902-016-9814-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Kostas Mavromaras & Stephane Mahuteau & Kostas Mavromaras & Sue Richardson & Rong Zhu, 2017. "Public–Private Sector Wage Differentials in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 93, pages 105-121, June.
    4. Clark, Andrew E. & D'Ambrosio, Conchita & Zhu, Rong, "undated". "Crime Victimisation Over Time and Sleep Quality," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 1901, CEPREMAP.
    5. repec:eee:jjieco:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:79-90 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:bla:growch:v:48:y:2017:i:4:p:590-610 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Karen Maguire & John V. Winters, 2017. "Satisfaction and Self-Employment: Do Women Benefit More from Being Their Own Boss?," Economics Working Paper Series 1713, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
    8. repec:eee:soceco:v:77:y:2018:i:c:p:20-28 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Brenig, Mattheus & Proeger, Till, 2016. "Putting a price tag on security: Subjective well-being and willingness-to-pay for crime reduction in Europe," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 278, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    10. Galina Besstremyannaya & Sergei Golovan, 2019. "Reconsideration of a simple approach to quantile regression for panel data: a comment on the Canay (2011) fixed effects estimator," Working Papers w0249, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
    11. Stillman, Steven & Velamuri, Malathi, 2016. "If Life Throws You Lemons, Try To Make Lemonade: Does Locus of Control Help People Cope with Unexpected Shocks?," IZA Discussion Papers 10210, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Zhu Rong & Chen Linfeng, 2016. "Overeducation, Overskilling and Mental Well-being," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(4), pages 1-33, October.
    13. Galina Besstremyannaya & Sergei Golovan, 2019. "Reconsideration of a simple approach to quantile regression for panel data: a comment on the Canay (2011) fixed effects estimator," Working Papers w0249, New Economic School (NES).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    panel quantile regression; subjective well-being; victimisation;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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