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Crime Victimisation Over Time and Sleep Quality

Author

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  • Andrew E. Clark

    (PJSE - Paris Jourdan Sciences Economiques - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, PSE - Paris School of Economics - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)

  • Conchita D’ambrosio

    (Uni.lu - Université du Luxembourg)

  • Rong Zhu

    (Flinders University [Adelaide, Australia])

Abstract

We here consider the relationship between the individual time profile of crime victimisation and sleep quality. Sleep quality worsens with contemporaneous crime victimisation, with physical violence having a larger effect than property crime. But crime history also matters, and past victimisation experience continues to reduce current sleep quality. Last, there is some evidence that the order of victimisation spells plays a role: consecutive years of crime victimisation affect sleep quality more adversely than the same number of years when not contiguous.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew E. Clark & Conchita D’ambrosio & Rong Zhu, 2019. "Crime Victimisation Over Time and Sleep Quality," PSE Working Papers halshs-01976867, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-01976867
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01976867v2
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    Keywords

    sleep quality; Crime; time; physical violence; property crimes;
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